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SPAN 532: Survey of Spanish Literature

What is a Library Database?

What is a Scholarly Journal?

Find background information

Students

Cait Barron. (2013, Sept. 26). KSU Photojournalism Students. Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/caitbarron/9976137326. Used under the Creative Commons License.

These Reference databases can help if you need to find some facts or background information on your topic.

Opposing Viewpoints and CQ Researcher

These databases are an excellent source for articles on all types of social and controversial issues. Different perspectives on the issues they cover are provided with topic overviewspro/con viewpoints, court-case overviews, and more.  If you're not sure about your topic, you can browse through a list of current topics and issues to help give you ideas. 

 

Opposing Viepoints

 

CQ Researcher

 

WSU Libraries has a number of print books from both the Opposing Viewpoints series and the Taking Sides series that can assist you in determining topics for a persuasive or informative speech. Search "opposing viewpoints" or "taking sides" in SmartSearch (on the Finding Books & Articles tab to the left).

Things to Consider When Reading a Research Article

Consider the following points when reading a scholarly article:

  1. Know your research question or argument. Though your question/argument may change or evolve as you delve deeper into the research process, you will want to have a solid idea of your research focus.
     
  2. You don't have to read the entire article in order. Start with the abstract which will give you a general summary of the article. If the abstract seems relevant then move to the conclusion or discussion section of the article to gain a better understanding of the article's main claims. At this point if the article does not seem relevant or useful then discard it. However, if the article does seem useful then spend as much time as necessary reading the article.
     
  3. Read critically. What is the author's argument? You will need to use your judgment when evaluating each source of information. Further research may be necessary if you find the author to be biased or you do not believe the validity of their argument.
     
  4. Read the reference section. Reading the references or works cited may lead you to other useful resources. You might also get a better understanding of the major players in the area you are researching.
     
  5. Take notes. How you do this is up to you. Make sure you keep your research question and argument in mind so you can be more efficient when taking notes.
    Created by Rachel Arteaga, CSU Chico: http://libguides.csuchico.edu/c.php?g=462359&p=3163509
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