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Collection Development

Collection Development Policies

Collection Development Policies

The  collection development policies describe collecting practices at WSU Libraries and define the scope and nature of the library collections for university faculty, staff, students, and administrators. Some policies cover general collections and resources while others address collecting in specific disciplines.  The policies serve as:

  • guides to library collections and resources

  • descriptions of academic interests and programmatic needs

  • indicators of collection priorities, strengths, weaknesses, and past collecting practices

  • planning documents for future collecting

  • useful tools in resource-sharing and cooperative ventures  with other libraries.

General Policies

General Collection Development Policies

The following collection development policies guide the selection of library materials not designated for a particular subject area or in a particular format or type of material collected across disciplines. General policies supplement existing subject policies and will be posted as revised.

If you have questions about these policies, please contact the Coordinator of Collection Development.

 
 

Electronic Resources Collection Development Policy

Introduction

General Selection Criteria for All Electronic Resources

  • Content
  • Access
  • User and Functionality
  • Archiving
  • Duplication and Substitution
  • Pricing and Cost Considerations
  • Vendor Considerations
  • Technical Considerations
  • Usage Statistics

Special Selection Criteria

  • E-Journals
  • E-Books
  • Free Web-Based Resources

Requesting New Resources

Post-Selection Process

  • Licensing Guidelines
  • General Acquisitions and Cataloging Guidelines

Review of Electronic Resources for Cancellation
 

Introduction

For the purpose of this policy, electronic resources are defined as monographic or serial resources, whether full-text or citation only, purchased or free, which require computer access. These resources may be selected as self-contained works (e.g. e-book, e-journal, online database, Web site) or as part of a larger collection or package.

The Wichita State University Libraries subscribes to electronic resources in support of the educational needs of students, faculty and staff of the University. This policy provides general guidelines for the selection, review, approval, acquisition, cataloging, and de-selection of electronic resources.

It is important to note that the selection of electronic resources presents unique challenges not encountered with traditional library materials. When purchased, electronic resources raise complicated issues involving networking, pricing, licensing, access and ownership, archiving, and rapidly changing technologies. The selector is required to work closely with other selectors, the Coordinator of Collection Development, and staff in other departments – especially Acquisitions and Cataloging.

Due to the high cost of electronic resources subscriptions, the Coordinator of Collection Development and the appropriate Subject Librarian(s) strive to make the most cost-effective and balanced purchase recommendations and decisions based on institutional needs. A major goal of acquiring electronic resources is the provision of access both on and off campus in the most affordable manner possible.

The Library’s current collection development policies for specific subject areas provide specific guidelines for the selection of library materials and information resources in all formats including electronic resources and can be found here.

The Library will pursue partnerships in cooperative acquisitions and cost-sharing both within and outside of the WSU Libraries including consortia such as the Kansas Regents Libraries Database Consortium, ESIG, BCR, Amigos, and Minitex.

This policy relates to the following types of e-resources:

  • Citation, abstracting, and full-text article databases, e.g. PsycINFO, Expanded Academic ASAP
  • Electronic journals (e-journals)
  • Electronic books (e-books)
  • Free Web-based resources

This policy is available as a General Policy on the WSU Libraries Collection Development home page here.

General Selection Criteria for All Electronic Resources

Content

Subject matter covered is clearly relevant to the curriculum and research needs of the primary WSU community, e.g. students, faculty and staff, as specified in the collection development policy for the subject area.

The electronic resource provides:

  • content at the appropriate intellectual level
  • depth of coverage and quality of information for user population
  • content from a reputable, reliable, and authoritative producer
  • current, accurate, unique, and complete information and updates
  • greater accessibility to information over other formats


Access 

Access to the electronic resource should include the following:

  • delivery via the Web
  • authentication by IP address (rather than passwords or logins), e.g. the Class B subnet for campus-wide access is 156.26.*.*
  • compatibility with the Library’s existing proxy server and software, E-Z Proxy
  • The preferred number of simultaneous users is unlimited. If not unlimited, the number of simultaneous users must be adequate
  • The Westside and Southside Centers considered authorized sites
  • WSU faculty, staff, students, and walk-in users defined as authorized users

The following should be avoided:

  • individual registration requirements
  • passwords or any other methods of individual authentication or authorization, unless 1) optional, e.g. allowing users to voluntarily create profiles for notification of new content or 2) passwords may be posted online for authenticated users


Use and Functionality

Electronic resources should adhere to conventional user expectations such as:

  • Availability of browsing and/or full-text searching
  • Availability of on-screen help and/or tutorials
  • Basic and guided/advanced searching
  • Helpful error messages (i.e., error message indicates specific problem(s) and provides possible alternatives)
  • Availability of value-added features such as multimedia and hyperlinks to and from other databases
  • Ability to print, save, and email results and/or articles
  • Discrete URL preferred for access at title level
     

Archiving

When appropriate, resources should be selected where the intellectual content of material is maintained in some form on a permanent basis. The following issues should be considered when selecting a resource:

  • Publisher’s commitment to archiving
  • Responsibility for archiving (publisher, vendor, or library)
  • Content and form of archive
  • Fees and restrictions
  • Effect of cancellation or termination on maintaining the archive
  • Technology required to maintain archive

Duplication and Substitution

When considering the replacement or duplication of a print subscription by an electronic resource, the following issues should be considered:

  • Archiving of electronic version
  • Need for different formats
  • Cost benefit to funding one or the other or both
  • Reliability of electronic format

In general, electronic bibliographic databases will not be duplicated in print except under special circumstances, e.g. exclusion of critical content in electronic version. At this time, the addition of an e-journal may or may not result in the cancellation of the equivalent print subscription. Print subscriptions are only canceled when cost effective and based on the recommendation of the Subject Librarian and the Coordinator of Collection Development with input from departmental faculty. E-books for the general and reference collection may be duplicated in print based on user needs.


Pricing and Cost Considerations

In considering the selection of an electronic resource, the following guidelines related to pricing and cost should be met:

  • Resource is cost-effective in both core content and updates
  • Library is able to sustain cost for the foreseeable future
  • Potential usage and/or uniqueness of information justifies cost
  • Pricing model is acceptable (e.g. one-time versus annual costs)

The following restrictions or situations should be avoided:

  • per-use or transaction charges
  • introductory pricing unless lock in reasonable increases over time
  • non-cancellation clauses unless accompanied by inflation cap and escape clause
  • bundling of electronic publications, e.g. can be purchased as package, but not individually

The availability of an electronic resource through consortium purchase should be considered first as such a purchase might be more cost-effective than an institutional purchase.

A multi-year agreement should be considered when appropriate as it may be more cost-effective than a one-year agreement.

Whenever possible, the pricing model should be based on student FTE. WSU’s official student FTE is reported on the Kansas BOR Web site at http://www.kansasregents.org/research/index.html.
 
Vendor Considerations

The following should be considered when selecting a resource:

  • Vendor provides responsive customer service and technical support that is available during library working hours
  • Availability and quality of training programs
  • Vendor’s reputation and business record suggests continued support for the product via updates or new versions
  • Documentation is thorough and clear

Technical Considerations

The resource should:

  • Meet usual and customary technical standards in the industry
  • Allow for local customizations via system administration access for the Library
  • Be compatible with the Library’s existing and/or future hardware
  • Be compatible with standard web browsers if accessible via the web

Usage Statistics

Usage statistics should be readily available in a user-friendly format, preferably COUNTER compliant (http://www.projectcounter.org)


Special Selection Criteria for Electronic Journals

A subscription to or purchase of an electronic journal will be considered if:

  • The electronic format offers value-added enhancements to make it preferable over, or a significant addition to, its print equivalent. Examples of such enhancements include wider access, flexibility in searching, and frequent updates.
  • It contains or covers the equivalent information compared to the print format.
  • Acquiring the electronic version is cost-effective (e.g., the cost differential is justified by demonstrated or expected increase in use) and provides greater access to users
  • Accessible through IP authentication to unlimited simultaneous users
  • Requirements for individual registration or passwords should be avoided unless passwords can be posted online for authenticated users. Profiles voluntarily created by users for notification of new content are not a problem.
  • Should only add journals with a significant run of issues or commitment to making a significant number of issues available electronically
  • Trial versions of electronic journals should not be added
  • Make note of time limits on access to back issues
  • Availability of content published prior to initial subscription date
  • Handling of backfiles

If a journal is acquired in the electronic format, the Subject Librarian and Coordinator of Collection Development (in conjunction with input from appropriate Library staff and departmental faculty) should determine if the print equivalent should be canceled.

Special Selection Criteria for E-Books

In general, the same selection criteria apply to electronic books as to books in print. E-books for the general and reference collections should be selected according to the appropriate subject collection development policy. Except under special circumstances, all e-books should be of a scholarly nature and supportive of the teaching and research mission of the University.

E-books may be purchased individually or part of a bundled package, e.g. BCR netLibrary collections. They may be purchased by WSU on its own or as part of a consortium purchase, e.g. BCR or RLDC. In either case, Subject Librarians (individually or through one of the subject Reference Collection Development Committees) will review the titles in their areas and make final purchase recommendations. For the purchase of a bundled collection, a majority of Subject Librarians must support the purchase.

At this time, an e-book may be selected without regard as to whether or not the title is currently held or being considered for purchase in print. An individual title may be purchased in print, electronic, or both formats as long as it meets appropriate selection criteria.

The following additional criteria for selecting e-books should be considered:

  • Consistency with print version, e.g. complete text with all tables, graphics, etc.
  • IP-authenticated access – either one user at a time or multiple simultaneous users (registration requirements, passwords, etc. should be avoided unless the passwords can be posted online for authenticated users)
  • Ability to download and print at least some limited content
  • Clearly understood rights to permanent access to the book, e.g. access in perpetuity versus annual subscription; outright purchase of books versus lease of content
  • Clearly understood pricing structure, e.g. one-time payment, annual subscription fee, or both
  • Individual purchase or part of bundle or package

Special Selection Criteria for Free Web-Based Resources

Selection of free web-based resources should follow the general guidelines for selecting all electronic resources, e.g. according to the appropriate subject collection development policy, of a scholarly nature, and supportive of the teaching and research mission of the University. However, due to the number of free resources available and often without print counterparts or longevity, additional criteria are listed below.

  • Amount of content should be significant.
  • Quality of the Web site should be indicated by peer review, review by other librarians, an authoritative sponsor or producers, and evidence of ongoing support (e.g. creation of archives, mirror sites, etc.
  • Availability of effective support for browsing or searching. Relatively easy to use; intuitive.
  • Reliable access to multiple simultaneous users
  • If registration and/or licensing are required, licenses must be submitted for approval through formal review process.
  • Resources selected as reference resources should meet the same selection criteria as resources that are purchased.
  • The resource is appropriate for addition to the WSU Libraries Online Catalog.

The following free Web-based resources are not appropriate for selection:

  • Fee-based resources available on a free-trial basis for limited period of time
  • Resources that require individual user registration or click through license
  • Password-protected Web sites available to single users, e.g. links publicized in print textbooks
  • Frequently unavailable resources

Requesting New Electronic Resources

Generally, new electronic acquisitions are requested by Subject Librarians through the Electronic Resources Review process in Collection Development. Final approval is given by the Coordinator of Collection Development and the Library Administration, when appropriate.

  1. In consultation with faculty, liaisons, appropriate library staff and others (as needed), the Subject Librarian will consider whether or not the product meets the selection criteria outlined in the Electronic Resources Collection Development Policy.
  2. Collection Development will request pricing for the product and investigate consortial purchase options.
  3. Collection Development will request a trial of the product, and all trials should be coordinated through the Coordinator of Collection Development. This will ensure that the trial is appropriately timed and publicized when necessary.
  4. In consultation with faculty, liaisons, appropriate library staff and others (as needed), the Coordinator of Collection Development will solicit feedback and evaluate the product based on the trial.
  5. Based on cost, perceived need, usage, the degree to which the electronic resource meets the selection criteria, and the priorities set by the Subject Librarians during the review process, the Coordinator of Collection Development, in consultation with the Library Administration, will: 1) decide whether or not to acquire and 2) if a decision to acquire is made, prioritize its purchase in relation to other electronic resources requested within budgetary constraints.

Post-Selection Process

Licensing

Once the decision has been made to purchase an electronic resource, the Coordinator of Collection Development reviews the license agreement, submits it to the University Counsel for review, and negotiates changes with the vendor/publisher. When negotiating license agreements, the Library keeps the interests of the user in mind and refrains from purchasing products where use restrictions would seriously impede research or be impossible to enforce. 

The following elements should be part of license agreements except under special circumstances:

  • Clear indication that content is either licensed or purchased outright
  • Listing of resources covered by license
  • Definition of authorized users includes WSU faculty, staff, students, and walk-in users
  • IP authentication as method of access
  • Minimal or no limitations on ILL and course pack use when appropriate
  • Listing of authorized sites

General Acquisitions and Cataloging Guidelines

The acquisition, cataloging, and withdrawal guidelines are under review by Collection Development and Technical Services with the hiring a new Electronic Resources Librarian in Technical Services in 2007. When the guidelines are finalized, they will be added to this document. 

Review of Electronic Resources for Cancellation

A subscription to a product may be cancelled if:

  • Usage statistics are consistently low over a significant period of time.
  • The product is no longer cost-effective.
  • The content provided is no longer meeting the needs of WSU users.
  • A competitive or better product becomes available either as an individual purchase or as a consortium purchase.
  • The vendor fails to hold up their end of the agreement and/or provides poor service.
  • A product’s price inflates such that it no longer is considered affordable.
  • The product’s content is found to duplicate content in another database.
  • A new vendor can deliver a superior product, including a more user-friendly search interface, providing greater and more reliable access at a reasonable cost, or meet other key criteria not met by a current vendor.

Prepared by Cathy Moore-Jansen, Coordinator of Collection Development, December 2006

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Subject Policies

The following collection development policies were written by the Subject Librarians and include a statement on the purpose and scope of the collection as well as a listing of specific subjects with assigned collecting levels.

A major effort is currently underway by the Subject Librarians to review and revise older subject policies to reflect new programs and/or publishing trends. All policies revised since 2000 are posted to this site. Until all policies are revised, a brief summary of collection interests and needs for each academic department has been provided. Click here for those summaries.

If you have questions, please contact the  appropriate Subject Librarian or contact the Coordinator of Collection Development.
 

Art & Design

A. Purpose of Collection 

1.  Program Information

The School of Art and Design offers programs in art education, art history, graphic design and studio arts. Courses are designed to train and educate art students pursuing a professional or liberal program. Additionally, programs are structured to allow students from other academic disciplines to enroll in art history and studio courses to gain an understanding of art. The school offers the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Art with emphasis in either studio art or art history; the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) with emphasis in art education, ceramics, painting/drawing, printmaking and sculpture; and the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design. The Graduate School offers programs leading to the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) with emphasis in ceramics, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. According to Fall 2011 records there are a total of 326 undergraduate Art & Design majors. Pre-Art and Design Majors (freshmen or sophomores who have declared their major to be Art & Design, but who have not begun their major requirements) numbered 198, along with 33 students enrolled in the BA in Art, 53 students in the BFA Graphic Design program, and 42 enrolled in the BFA in Art. Graduate students numbered 14 pursuing a Master of Fine Arts degree.

2.  Collection Description

Lois Swan Jones states that “Art was not created in a vacuum. Upon each work of art there were many influences: artistic, educational, literary, religious, musical, theatrical, historical, political, economical, social, geographical and scientific.1 ” For that reason many cross-disciplinary resources support the curriculum and the resources for such studies are often stretched thin. This was evident when the collection holdings were compared against the bibliography contained within Art Information: Research Methods and Resources, 3rd ed., by Lois Swan Jones. The results show that Wichita State’s holdings currently contain only 51% of all sources listed. This is expected in a few individual areas like architecture (42%), in which WSU offers no degreed program. In this particular case the 42% of holdings in the area of architecture is an unexpectedly high percentage, but this number is elevated by titles acquired to support Public Planning and some Engineering programs. In other collecting areas, such as Commercial Design (Swan Jones’ designation including graphic design studies), for which WSU owns only 25% of these essential titles, programs appear to be under supported. The low percentage of titles owned overall seems to have developed over a long period of time due to a shrinking budget, economic inflation, the wide range of programs offered and the fact that the bibliography used for collection comparison is somewhat dated.

Art Information lists over 240 journal titles deemed vital in support of art research. Due to the changing nature of serial publications, there will be several titles that will have ceased publication since the time of the bibliography’s publication. Although some minor duplication appears, in a title-by-title comparison, Wichita State University maintains print subscriptions for a mere 20% of the recommended journals. After the serial review project of 2011, Wichita State University continues to subscribe to 52 fine arts journal titles in print, the majority of which are considered to be core titles. Print journal subscriptions should continue to be maintained in the future as full electronic access is still developing and as inflationary rates in this area have risen very little. If additional funding should become available in future, the areas of photography, and the globalization of contemporary art should be expanded as they is particularly underrepresented in serials. It should also be noted that full text-full image online serial publications in the area of the fine arts have become more available but the omission of images due to licensing restrictions, as well as unreliable reproduction of color images, are still considerations in future collection development decisions for the acquisition of new e-journal packages. See Appendix C.

     Jones, Lois Swan. Art Information: Research Methods and Resources. 3rd ed. Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 1990.

3. Trends

As all undergraduate art students are required to fulfill 12 credit hours of art history, the collection should continue to maintain a solid foundation in art history. However, as programs in Graphic Design and the Studio Arts are so vital to the college, the collection should also reflect their robust needs.

B.  Scope of Coverage

1. Chronological focus

All time periods are collected

2. Geographic Focus

Western European and North American art are primary collection areas, however African, Asian, and Latin American art areas are a strong secondary focus. Significant works in other geographic areas are acquired without limitations.

3. Formats and Materials Collected

Acquisition is based on content. Though the collection is composed primarily of monographs and serials, videos, computer software and other non-book formats may be purchased on request and as important titles become available. Conventional DVD and/or Blue-Ray formats will be purchased over VHS whenever available, as they are more functional in the classroom, more durable, and may be housed in a more economic fashion. All regions of playback may be collected.

4. Formats and Materials Not Collected

Slides and original art works are not collected.

5. Publication/Imprint Dates

Current publications are emphasized but older publications will be acquired to fill in collection gaps. 

6. Place of Publication

Place of publication is not a limiting factor.

7. Languages Collected

English is emphasized in publications composed primarily of text. Important works in German, French or Italian will be acquired as needed. Where reproductions are of primary importance, language is not a limitation in selection.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Other local resources supporting art collections are the central branch of the Wichita Public Library, the Wichita Art Museum and the Art Resource Center of the Wichita Art Museum. The Wichita Public Library maintains a collection of monographs and videos emphasizing the studio arts and crafts. The Wichita Art Museum curatorial collection does not circulate to the public, but there holdings may be accessed by appointment and their holdings are listing in the WSU Online Catalog, while the Art Resource Center provides a teaching collection of art-related videos, slides, CD-ROMs, children’s monographs, curriculum guides, posters and learning kits. The Art Resource Center is a satellite of the National Gallery of Art and holds all NGA materials, in addition to other resources. In addition, the Wichita State University Interlibrary Loan department provides access to extensive resources through cooperative efforts on a national level. 

E. Related Collection Evaluations

Please refer to: Collection Evaluation 2011 – Art & Design containing a description of the 2011 Faculty Survey. This document may be found in the Collection Development and Research Services Group offices. 

F. Other Factors

Appendix A – Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

Appendix B – Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

Appendix C – Collection comparison to Art Information 

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

APPENDIX C - COLLECTION COMPARISON TO ART INFORMATION: RESEARCH METHODS AND RESOURCES, 3RD ED, BY LOIS SWAN JONES

General Art Research Tools

Art Encyclopedias and Dictionaries  48%

Artistic Styles, Periods and Cultures  71%

Artistic Styles and Historic Periods  81%

North American Studies  56%

Other Geographic Locations  52%

Museum Collection and Exhibition Information  36%

Indexing and Abstracting Resources and Databases  63%

Bibliographies for Art Research  63%

Sales Information  17%

Visual Resources and Subject Indexing  26%

Other Resources  54%

Specialized Resources for Various Media

Architecture  42%

Prints and the Art of the Book  56%

Photography  40%

Decorative Arts and Crafts  43%

Fashion, Costumes and Jewelry  44%

Film and Video  56%

Commercial Design  25%

Museum Studies and Art/Museum Education  73%

Reference on Subjects and Symbols in Art  55%

Journal Titles

All fine arts areas  20%

Total number of titles listed: 2564

Total number of titles owned: 1300 (51%)

 

 

 

Biology

A. Purpose of Collection

     1.  Program Information

     The Department of Biological Sciences at WSU offers a broad curriculum leading to B.A. and B.S. degrees, a biochemistry field major with the Department of Chemistry and an M.S. degree at the graduate level. Special emphasis is placed in the areas of cellular/molecular biology and ecology/environmental biology.  Research training is available in microbiology, cell, molecular, endocrine, organismal, reproductive, and environmental biology.  The Department also participates in an interdisciplinary degree program leading to a Master of Environmental Science.

The Department of Biological Sciences coordinates with other members of the Wichita biomedical and scientific community to provide teaching, research and technical training to meet the needs of the Wichita community and the State of Kansas.  The department’s strategic plan includes goals to strengthen its teaching and research program in the area of cellular and molecular biology, and to respond to the increased need and demand for training in the environmental sciences.  Faculty, of which there are currently 15, are actively involved in teaching and research.
 

     2. Collection Description

     The collections supporting the Biological Sciences here at Wichita State University consist primarily of the Library of Congress call numbers QH – QR, though my analyses show that biologists also draw heavily from many other areas of the collection including medicine and chemistry.  The journal, book, and electronic collections function mainly to support the undergraduate and graduate curricula and to provide a minimal collection for support of faculty research.  Since our department has graduate-level programs and an active research program, our collection should be more at the research level.  High materials costs and the library budget limit us to very selectively collecting research materials in narrow subject areas.  We rely on online journal packages, full-text databases, interlibrary loan, and document delivery to supplement the collection.

     3.  Anticipated Trends

     Some of the most interesting developments in science today are happening in the field of biological science.  Many different research areas are of particular interest to biologists currently.  Biologists question how evolution works and the beginnings of life including the interesting question of whether it originated independently on earth or whether it was brought here by meteorites.  Also of interest are the fields of biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics - how life works at the molecular level, with important applications to many fields including medicine and agriculture.  Research in neuroscience has applications in artificial intelligence, medicine, psychology, and other fields.  Biotechnology, and cloning in particular, are of interest not only to scientists but to the commercial world, government, and the general public.  Zoology and botany are of interest for their applications to medicine, agriculture and food production.  Ecology and environmental science make important contributions to sustaining life on the planet.

     Periodicals, due to their timeliness, will continue to be the publishing vehicle of choice for biologists.  As has been happening over the past few years, electronic books and journals and other electronic publications, such as online genome libraries, will continue to gain in acceptance and popularity.  Journal publishers commonly having bundled electronic journals along with paper subscriptions in the past are now increasingly trying to make electronic journals the primary consideration.  Although concerns continue regarding archiving, and publishers changing or deleting original content, many libraries are giving up hardcopy subscriptions in favor of electronic subscriptions.

 

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological emphasis

     The main emphasis will be on current materials, with occasional acquisitions of important classical and historical materials, primarily as requested by faculty in the Biological Sciences department.

2.  Geographic Focus

     Materials focusing on Kansas, adjoining states, and the Midwest will be a priority in our collection, but since the majority of materials published in this subject area do not have a geographic focus, this is not a huge concern for this portion of the Libraries’ collections.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

     Any format useful for study, teaching, or research, including software, video, audio, online, journals, books, reports, and conference proceedings, among others, will be considered.  Online materials will be purchased when possible since the department has expressed a preference for online accessibility.

     Due to the large number of introductory-level biology classes, and because of our large Health Professions program, textbooks will be purchased where appropriate.  Textbooks are useful to these groups, and also to some upper-division students, because of their value in providing materials for comparison and different perspectives.

     Undergraduate and graduate level books will be acquired.  Research level materials will be acquired to support current, active research programs at WSU, and at the request of faculty.  Popular works will be acquired on the basis of their usefulness to the undergraduate program.  Juvenile materials will be considered in cooperation with the juvenile materials bibliographer.

     Limited library resources, including financial and space resources, do not allow for duplication of materials except in very limited circumstances based on heavy demand.

     Our current serials policy states that, in order to add a new serial to our collection, an existing title of equal or greater value must be cancelled.  That being said, the biological sciences librarian is willing to consider requests for extra funding for new departments or research areas.  Serials review projects will be conducted as needed or as requested by the subject department or the Head of Collection Development.  These projects will be used to maintain the focus of the collection on the needs of the University and also to control costs.

     Our primary electronic bibliographic database subscriptions serving the biological sciences are MEDLINE,BasicBIOSIS, and H.W. Wilson’s General Science Abstracts.  We are in the process of trying to upgrade from our current combination of paper subscription to Biological Abstracts and online BasicBIOSIS access to the full online version of Biological Abstracts.  A master’s level biology program with active faculty research combined with the relatively small incremental cost make this move advisable if funds and library priorities permit.

     Access will be provided to online journals via subscription and when the publisher/agent supports IP-protected, proxy-friendly access.  Also considered will be freely available sites which provide significant content.

     Electronic books will be considered in the same light as other materials available for the collection.  Given the department’s stated preference for electronic availability, where there are paper and electronic copies available, we will purchase the electronic copy when funds and library priorities permit.

     The Life Sciences Librarian will consider gifts in the same light as other materials considered for the collection.  Items not retained can either be returned to the giver or disposed of as the coordinator of collection development sees fit.  If the giver wishes, they can be referred to the Collection Development Assistant for a list of used book/journal vendors whom they can contact about selling materials and for sources for estimating the value of materials donated.  The Wichita Public Library also accepts donations for their used book sales.

     WSU does not have an active weeding program.  As a research library, we consider that there is historical value in older materials, and retain less frequently used materials as a service not only to our university, but also to other universities in Kansas, the U.S., and the rest of the world.  Occasionally, when an item becomes damaged beyond repair, it will be necessary to consider it for discarding.  If the Life Sciences Librarian considers the item’s content to still be pertinent, a replacement will be considered.

     The Life Sciences Librarian will consider any request for purchase of materials from patrons.  Requests for serials, if the titles are considered useful for the WSU community, will be referred to the department chair for consideration (see Serials Policy above.)

     The Life Sciences Librarian will consult review sources, including Book Review DigestBook Review IndexChoice, and others, as needed in making selection decisions.
 

4.  Publication/Imprint Dates

     Currency is usually highly desirable in the sciences but older materials will be considered as needed.

5.  Place of Publication

     Any place of publication will be considered, but the collection will mostly focus on materials published in the U.S. and Europe.

6.  Languages Collected

     Non-English materials will be acquired only at the specific request of faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

A broad range of biology subjects will be collected for support of the undergraduate and graduate programs and for general non-majors.  Research level materials will be collected in narrow ranges as needed based on local needs for WSU faculty and graduate students.  Main focuses of our collection development efforts will mirror those of the department, currently ecology/environmental science and cellular/molecular biology.  See Appendix A for a detailed breakdown of subjects and collecting levels.
 

D. Subjects Excluded

     All biology subjects will be considered since broad coverage of subject areas is needed to support undergraduate and graduate education.
 

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

     WSU has no formal cooperative collection development arrangements with individual libraries.  Cooperative efforts such as the Regents Library Database Committee allow for consortial purchases and substantial discounts on electronic resources.

     Biology faculty and students, due to the interdisciplinary nature of their work, will utilize other collections within the WSU Libraries, including the medical collections, the chemistry collection, the geology collection, etc.  WSU affiliates may also wish to take advantage of the collections of other local libraries such as University of Kansas School of Medicine - Wichita, and also the libraries of the University of Kansas and Kansas State University.  Many of these materials will be available through interlibrary loan, while some may require on-site access.  If WSU affiliates are planning to visit non-WSU libraries, they are encourages to phone in advance to determine schedules and any local policies for access to individuals who are not students or faculty of the institution.
 

F. Related Collection Development Policies

     See also the WSU collection development policies for the other relevant science disciplines (mainly chemistry and geology) and medicine.
 

G. Related Collection Evaluations

     A collection evaluation for the biological sciences was performed in 2002.  See also the WSU collection evaluations for the other relevant science disciplines (mainly chemistry and geology) and medicine.
 

H. Other Factors

     N/A

APPENDIX A - Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

Library of Congress Class and Subject # Shelves CL (Current Collection)

Previous Goal

GL
(Goal)

QH 1 - 200 Natural History Serials, Conservation, and General Works by Region 97.75 C2 C2 C2
QH 201 - 278 Microscopy 14 E None E
QH 301 – 358 General Biology 238.75 C1 C1 C1
QH 359 - 425 Evolution 18.8 C1 C1 C1
QH 426 - 539 Genetics 132.85 C1 C1 C1
QH 540 - 572 Ecology 54 C1 C1 C1
QH 573 - 671 Cytology 79 C1 None C1
QK 1 - 673 Botany 91.75 C2 C1 C1
QL 1 - 361 Zoology 87 C2 C1 C1
QL 362 - 604 Invertebrates 84 C2 C2 C2
QL 605 - 749 Vertebrates 93 C1 C1 C1
QL 750 - 798 Animal Behavior 43.75 D D C2
QL 799 - 950 Anatomy 28.75 D D E
QL 951 - 9999 Embryology 16 D D D
QM 1 - 9999 Human Anatomy 22.61 D D E
QP 1 - 350 Human Physiology 250.66 C2 D C1
QP 351 - 500 Neurophysiology and Neuropsychology 112 D D E
QP 501 - 9999 Biochemistry, Hormones, Enzymes, Etc. 135.5 C2 C1 C1
QR 1 - 9999 Microbiology, Immunology, Bacteria, Viruses 191.9 C2 C1 C1
 
APPENDIX B -  Explanation of Collecting Levels
     1. Collecting Levels
          Current Collection (CL) - existing strength of collection (required)
          Collection Goal (GL) - desired or target collecting goal (required)
          Acquisitions Commitment (AC) - current collecting level or growth rate
          Preservation Commitment (PA) - commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)
   
 

2. Collecting Level Codes

     Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes: 

          A       Comprehensive Level

          B       Research Level (doctoral)

          C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

          C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

          D       Basic Information Level

          E       Minimal Level

          NC     Not Collected

     The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
  • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus
 
 
 
 
 
 

Communications

A. Purpose of Collection Program Information

The communication collection primarily supports the curricular and research needs of students and faculty within the Elliott School of Communication. The School presently offers programs leading to a bachelor's degree in Communication in five concentration areas in addition to an open emphasis degree which is tailored to the students' needs under the guidance of the School. A Masters of Arts in Communication may be earned by students in the Elliott School or by students focusing on on Theartre/Drama, and may be completed employing either a thesis or a non-thesis option. A Certificate in Applied Communication, requiring eighteen hours of course work, is also offered by the School for professionals interested in improving their understanding of the various aspects of communication.

The collection may most easily be considered through an understanding of the five undergraduate concentration areas:

  • Strategic Communication
    • A generalist approach is taken in this concentration which focuses on interpersonal communication, organizational communication, and Public Affairs.
  • Broadcast Journalism
    • Core Courses for this concentration:
      • COMM 401 - Beat Reporting
      • COMM 422 - Broadcast News
      • COMM 622 - Studio B: Practicum in Broadcast Journalism
  • Electronic Media
    • Core Coursed for this concentration
      • COMM 303 - Audio Production
      • COMM 304 Studio Video Production
      • COMM 332 - Writing for Electronic Media
      • COMM 604 - Field Video Production
      • COMM 609 - Interactive Media Production
  • Integrated Marketing Communications
    • Core Courses for this concentration
      • COMM 324 - Introduction for Integrated Marketing Communication
      • COMM 502 - Public Information Writing
      • COMM 510 - Editing for Print
      • COMM 525 - Advertising Copywriting
      • COMM 626 - Integrated Marketing communications Campaigns
  • Print Journalism
    • Core Courses for this concentration
      • COMM 301 - Introductory Photojournalism
      • COMM 401 - Beat Reporting
      • COMM 500 - Advanced Reporting
      • COMM 510 - Editing for Print

Collection Description

The communications collection currently includes roughly 5,000 monographic and serial volumes. The Libraries subscribes to thirty-four communications journals, and has holdings in an additional forty titles. The reference collection is relatively small, composed of less than fifty volumes. Indexes to the journal literature makes up the most significant portion of the reference collection. ComIndex, an online index to about ninety titles specific to communication, is limited as it does not contain abstracts or provide indexing through a controlled vocabulary. Indexes useful in communication research also include the education database ERIC for research in communication theory, and the business databases ABI/INFORM for theoretical articles on organizational communication and marketing, and Business and Company Resource Center for articles dealing with specific marketing campaigns. The database LEXIS Academic includes the full text of major newspapers published in the United States but unfortunately does not provide the layout. LEXIS Academic also provides transcripts from most television news programs.

Anticipated Trends

Increasing globalization's effect on the media is perhaps the major trend which will affect the content of collection development in communication in the future. An increased attention will be given to international media and the media in a greater number of nations in the collection. The trend toward electronic media and away from print media will also greatly impact the character of works collected. And as is true of all social science disciplines, the continuing importance of interdisciplinary approaches to communication research will result in the purchasing material which does not fall strictly into the communication collection's parameters.

                

Computer Science

A. Purpose of Collection

1.   Program Information

The computer science department offers courses of study leading to the BA, BS, or MS.  Several certificate programs are also offered and include, Information Technology Certificate, Computer Competency Certificate, Advanced Computer Competency Certificate, and Internet Competency Certificate.

2.   Collection Description

Given that the computer science department only offers Master’s degrees, collecting is at the C level.  The collection is a broad and deep undergraduate and master’s level collection that emphasizes the needs of the WSU community, in addition to the students and faculty of the computer science department.  This does not ignore the fact that the faculty in computer science and many other departments use upper level material in this field. The computer science collection is supplemented by the electrical/computer engineering collection.  Purchasing decisions are often made with both departments in mind and the computer science collection, in particular, benefits from the ECE program offering a PhD. 

3.   Anticipated Trends

Conference proceedings have become increasingly important in this field and to the faculty.  This trend will continue.  Due to the amount of publishing in this area, students and faculty will have to rely on the library’s interlibrary loan service.  Other document delivery services will continue to be investigated.
 

B. Scope of Coverage

1.   Chronological

Focus is on current materials, a small collection of classical and historical materials will be bought

2.   Geographic Focus

Primary focus is on U.S. computer societies

3.   Formats and Materials Collected

Primary focus in this subject is on the journal collection and selected conference proceedings to be purchased annually.  E-journals and e-books are formats in which the library’s collection will continue to grow over the next few years. 

4.   Formats and Materials Not Collected

Videos will only be acquired at the specific request of faculty.

5.   Publication/Imprint Dates

Current dates only.  There will be no retrospective collecting unless specifically requested by faculty or to replace missing core materials.

6.   Place of Publication

Primarily U.S.

7.   Languages Collected

Non-english materials will be bought at the specific request of faculty only
 

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D. Subjects Excluded

None.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Electrical/Computer Engineering and Mathematics.  Computer architecture, hardware, and control systems will be purchased from ECE funds.  Statistical programming will be purchased from mathematics.

F. Related Collection DevelopmentPolicies

See Electrical/Computer Engineering

G. Related Collection Evaluations

H. Other Factors

Multiple copies of basic manuals PC programs, software, and operating systems are purchased, concentrating on those used on campus.  A small collection of computer manuals is maintained as Reserve items due to the popularity of these items by faculty, staff, and students outside of the computer science program. 

 

Appendix A—Specific Subjects Collected with Levels

 

 

SUBJECT

CL

GL

LC CLASS

Office Automation

D

D

HF5548

Cybernetics

E

E

Q300-390

Bionics

 

E

Q317-321

Pattern Recognition, Perception Theory

C1

C1

Q327

Artificial Intelligence

D

C1

Q334-342

Information Theory

C2

C2

Q350-390

Computer Science-General

C2

C1

QA75.5-76.33

Computer Science-History & Biography

C2

D

QA76.17-76.26

Computer Science-Study & Teaching, Research

D

C2

QA76.27-QA76.36

Computers, General

D

C2

QA76.38-QA76.545

Online Data Processing

D

C1

QA76.55-76.5

Multimedia Systems

 

D

QA76.575

Computer Programming/Languages

C1

C1

QA76.6-76.73

Computer Software

C2

C2

QA76.75-.765

Software Engineering

C1

C1

QA76.758

Application Software

C1

C1

QA76.76.C672

Expert Systems

C1

C1

QA76.76.E95

Hypertext Systems

C2

C2

QA76.76.H94

Interactive Media

C2

C2

QA76.76.I59

Operating Systems

C2

C2

QA76.76.O63

Systems Software

C2

C2

QA76.76.W56

Windows

D

D

QA76.76.W56

Special Computers & Systems

D

D

QA76.8

Access Control, Security

C1

C1

QA76.9.A25

Architecture

C2

C2

QA76.9.A73

Special Topics in Computer Science

D

D

QA76.9

Graph Theory

D

D

QA166

Machine Theory

C2

C2

QA267-268.5

Modeling & Simulation

C2

C1

T57.62

Management Information Systems

C1

C1

T58.6

Computer Networks

C1

D

TK5105.5

Image Processing

D

E

TA1637

 

APPENDIX B -  Explanation of Collecting Levels
     1. Collecting Levels
          Current Collection (CL) - existing strength of collection (required)
          Collection Goal (GL) - desired or target collecting goal (required)
          Acquisitions Commitment (AC) - current collecting level or growth rate
          Preservation Commitment (PA) - commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)
   
 

2. Collecting Level Codes

     Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes: 

          A       Comprehensive Level

          B       Research Level (doctoral)

          C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

          C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

          D       Basic Information Level

          E       Minimal Level

          NC     Not Collected

     The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
  • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus

Counseling, Educational & School Psychology

A. Purpose of Collection

1.  Program Information

The Department of Counseling, Educational & School Psychology (CESP) offers graduate programs only, with two degrees at the Masters level and one Specialist degree beyond the Master’s level.  One post-masters certificate program is also offered. Students completing these programs typically pursue careers as school counselors, community counselors, educational psychologists, or school psychologists.  Programs of study include:

•     Master of Education in Counseling (MEd)

Students who wish to become licensed School Counselors in Kansas must have valid professional teaching licenses as well as the MEd in counseling.  Students in this program may also choose to become Licensed Professional Counselors, and work within the community.  The course of study includes the following subject areas: psychological foundations; statistics and research methods; human development; assessment; ethics; and individual and group counseling theory and techniques.

•     Master of Education in Educational Psychology (MEd)

This program focuses on “how people learn from instruction, and with developing educational materials, programs and techniques that enhance learning” (CESP webpage).  Students of all stages of development are of interest, from infants to the elderly, both in school and in other settings (corporate, military, etc.). Assessment is a key component of the program.

•     Specialist in Education in School Psychology (EdS)

Students in this program must have completed a masters degree in educational psychology, counseling, or a directly related area to apply for admission to this program. An additional 39 credit hours of study are required to earn the Specialist degree.  The program of study includes courses in counseling theory, counseling techniques, psychopathology, ethics, multicultural issues, intelligence testing, diagnostic testing, school-based interventions, personality assessment, and mild exceptionalities.

•     Post-Masters Certificate in Play Therapy

This certificate is offered through the Counseling program.  Five courses are offered, including Fundamentals of Play Therapy, Play Therapy with Young Children, Child Psychopathology in Play Therapy, Advanced Techniques in Child and Play Therapy, and a 100-hour Practicum in Play Therapy.

2.  Collection Description

Monographs:  

The Library’s monograph collection currently contains nearly 7,000 titles in the core Library of Congress call number areas relevant to Counseling, Educational & School Psychology (portions of LB and LC—see Appendix A).  Materials in these call number areas circulated (were checked out) over 3,000 times in 2008, showing that this is a heavily used part of the Library’s collection.  The number shown above for materials most closely related to Counseling, Educational & School Psychology does not include the thousands of additional titles held in related disciplines such as Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, Pediatrics, etc., that are also used by students and faculty in this department.

Journals:

The Library maintains subscriptions to twenty-five journals directly related to Counseling, Educational, & School Psychology (Please see Appendix C).  In most cases, both print and online access are available, but a few titles are only available electronically, and several others are available in print format only.  This core collection of journals is supported by a large number of additional titles which are available electronically through numerous databases to which the library subscribes (see Databases section just below).  A substantial number of additional paper and full text electronic subscriptions are maintained in related subject areas such as psychology, sociology, social work, child development, and psychotherapy.

Databases:

Students and faculty have both on-campus and off-campus access to a number of abstracting and indexing databases to the journal literature in this subject area.  ERIC and PsycINFO are the most important databases, followed by Education Full Text, Mental Measurements Yearbook, MEDLINE, Sociological Abstracts, Social Work Abstracts, and Dissertation AbstractsGoogle Scholar and JSTOR were also noted by faculty in the department as being useful.

 

3.  Anticipated Trends

Counseling, Educational & School Psychology Faculty listed the following as emerging trends or subjects in their areas of specialization:

•     Accountability, diversity

•     Epistemological beliefs, cultural sensitivity, play therapy, school psychology, technology in education

•     Post modern constructivist approach to counseling, standards based assessment, globalization-international perspectives, technology applications

•     Interdisciplinary research

•     Mental health diagnosis, and interventions and treatment plans for specific populations

 

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Emphasis will be placed on works dealing with contemporary issues and practice.

2.  Geographic Focus

Works related to Counseling, Educational & School Psychology as they are practiced in the United States will be the primary focus of the collection.  Materials on practice in other countries or on a global basis are also of high value, and will be collected on a somewhat more selective basis.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Department faculty listed (in order of importance) journals (especially electronic journals), monographs, internet sources, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, etc.), statistical sources, dissertations, conference proceedings, and government publications as useful formats for the collection. Both paper and electronic formats will be collected, with an emphasis on electronic formats for journals, when possible.  Videos will be collected at the request of faculty.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will be collected only when that is the sole format available.  Textbooks are not normally acquired, but may be purchased occasionally to provide broad overviews for foundational areas.

5.  Publication/Imprints Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials; older materials will be collected very selectively.

6.  Place of Publication

Primary focus will be placed on materials published in the United States.  Materials published in other countries are also valued, and will be collected on a more selective basis.

7.  Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected.  Materials in other languages will be collected at the request of faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels (See Appendix A for Details)

D. Subjects Excluded

None

 

APPENDIX A – SPECIFIC SUBJECTS COLLECTED (with Collecting Levels)

 

Counseling, Educational & School Psychology

Materials that support teaching and research for this subject area fall within numerous areas of the Library of Congress Classification system, making it somewhat difficult to narrow the areas of primary interest into a few broad call number areas.  Care has been taken to ensure that subject areas noted by departmental faculty to be of primary interest are reflected in the call number areas below.  Those subject areas include: school counseling, educational psychology, learning, memory, epistemological beliefs (ways of knowing), career development and counseling, reading comprehension, program evaluation, research design, statistics, counseling at-risk populations, self- mutilation, animal-assisted therapy, play therapy, loss and grief, group counseling, child abuse, multicultural counseling, social and cognitive development, and technology in education.

LC Class Divisions, Categories & Subjects CL GL
LB Theory and Practice of Education    
LB 1027.5-1027.55 School counseling and guidance C1 C1
LB 1028.3-1028.8 Educational technology and e-learning, instructional design C1 C1
LB 1050-1050.6 Reading C1 C1
LB 1050.9-1091 Educational Psychology C1 C1
LB 1101-1139 Child Study C1 C1
LB 3013.6 Ethics for School Psychologists C1 C1
LB 3050-3060.87 Education tests, measurements, evaluations and examinations C1 C1
LC Special Aspects of Education    
LC 189-214.53 Educational sociology C1 C1
LC 225-226.7 Home and school C1 C1
LC 1037-1037.8 Career education C1 C1
BD Speculative Philosophy    
BD 143-237 Epistemology. Theory of Knowledge C2 C1
BF Psychology    
BF 176-176.5 Psychological tests and testing    
BF 309-499 Consciousness. Cognition (including learning, attention, comprehension, memory, intelligence, etc.) C1 C1
BF 636-637 Applied psychology C1 C1
BF 712-724 Developmental Psychology (including infant psychology, child psychology, adolescence, cognitive development, and play) C1 C1
HF Commerce    
HF 5381 Career and occupational guidance C2 C1
HQ The Family, Marriage and Women    
HQ 767.8-799.2 Children. Child development (including child life, play, socialization, children's rights) C1 C1
HV Social Pathology, Social and Public Welfare, Criminology    
HV 697-4959 Social service. protection, assistance and relief C1 C1
HV 713-741 Children (child welfare and child abuse) C1 C1
HV 888-907 Children with disabilities C1 C1
HV 1421-1441 Young adults, youth, teenagers C1 C1
HV 1551-3024 People with disabilities C1 C1
RC Internal Medicine, Practice of Medicine    
RC 475-489 Psychiatry. Psychotherapy (including types of therapy such as individual, group, family, crisis, play, animal assisted, multicultural aspects) C1 C1
RJ Pediatrics    
RJ 499-507 Pediatrics. Diseases of children and adolescents. Child psychiatry (including play therapy) C1 C1
RM Therapeutics, Pharmacology    
RM 931 Rehabilitation therapy (including animal assisted therapy)    

 

APPENDIX B – EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL)  -- existing strength of collection  (required) Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal  (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate  (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. COLLECTING LEVEL CODES*

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A                 Comprehensive Level

B                Research Level (doctoral)

C1              Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2              Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D                Basic Information Level

E                Minimal Level

NC              Not Collected

 

The following is a detailed definition of each code:

 

A             Comprehensive Level.   

A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field.  This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.

 

B             Research Level.

A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources--  in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.

 

C1           Advanced  Study  Level.  

A  collection  which  is  adequate  to  support  the  course  work  of  advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works  of  more  important  writers,  selections  from  the  works  of  secondary  writers,  a  selection  of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject.

 

C2           Basic Study Level.   

A collection  which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs (as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.

 

D             Basic Information Level.  

A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.

 

E        Minimal Level.

A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.

 

NC      Not Collected.  

A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.

 

* The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

APPENDIX C – CURRENT PRINT & ONLINE JOURNAL SUBSCRIPTIONS – CESP*

Title Print Online
British Journal of Educational Psychology Yes Yes
Career Development for Exceptional Individuals Yes Yes
Career Development Quarterly Yes Yes
Counselor Education & Supervision Yes Yes (last 18 mos.)
Educational Considerations (career education) Yes Yes
Educational Psychologist Yes Yes
Educational Psychology Yes Yes
Educational Psychology in Practice Yes Yes
Educational Psychology Review Yes Yes
International Journal of Rehabilitation Research Yes No
Journal of Career Assessment No Yes
Journal of Career Development No Yes
Journal of Educational Psychology No Yes
Journal of Employment Counseling Yes Yes (last 18 mos.)
Journal of Instructional Psychology Yes Yes
Journal of Multicultural Counseling & Development Yes Yes (last 18 mos.)
Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment No Yes
Journal of Rehabilitation (vocational rehabilitation) Yes Yes
Journal of School Psychology No  Yes
Measurement & Evaluation in Counseling & Development Yes Yes (last 18 mos.)
Professional School Counseling Yes Yes
Psychology in the Schools Yes Yes
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin No Yes
School Psychology Quarterly Yes Yes
School Psychology Review Yes Yes

* List up-to-date as of 8/11/09

 

 

 

Criminal Justice

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The program in Criminal Justice was established in 1934 as a police training program. Since then, the program scope has been broadened to encompass the scientific study of crime, criminals, the criminal justice system and the process of law-giving. The faculty hold degrees in a variety of disciplines including criminology, criminal justice, psychology, sociology, law, and public administration.

The program currently offers a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice and a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice (MACJ). Three certificates in criminal justice are also available emphasizing corrections, forensic criminology, or law enforcement. Students in criminal justice can combine their coursework with a variety of related fields including investigative reporting, medical technology, laboratory sciences, psychology, and sociology.

The major in criminal justice consists of at least 36 credit hours, 21 of which are core courses and 15 are electives. The minor in criminal justice consists of at least 18 hours of criminal justice courses. Core courses examine corrections, law enforcement, courts and judicial systems, research methods, crime causation and criminal justice policy, and contemporary issues.

The Master's program integrates theory and practice to prepare students for positions in criminal justice system practice, management, policymaking, as well as in research, teaching, and preparation for law school or further graduate study. Core courses focus on quantitative research methods, applied criminal theory, and critical issues in the criminal justice system. Several courses are taught entirely online or as “hybrid” courses, which combine traditional class meetings with online components.

The School of Community Affairs also offers the related degree Bachelor of Science in Forensic Science. This interdisciplinary degree, which combines coursework in anthropology, chemistry, biology, psychology, and criminal justice, is designed to meet an increasing demand for trained forensic scientists and technicians.

2. Collection Description

The collections supporting criminal justice are located primarily in the Library of Congress call number range HV 6001—HV 9960. However, criminal justice overlaps with related social science disciplines including sociology, psychology, anthropology, and biology. The monograph collection is well-used, with 66% of all criminal justice titles added since 2005 circulating at least once. The Libraries has a good number of recommended books in criminal justice, with a few small gaps. The titles currently in the collection reflect some emerging trends in the criminal justice field, including cybercrime and situational crime prevention, although these areas can be developed further.

WSU Libraries carries a good number of criminal justice journals. The collection is supplemented by holdings in related social sciences disciplines. Out of the 643 titles on the current serials list from Criminal Justice Abstracts, 405 (63%) are currently received in print or electronic formats. Some of these journals are well-regarded and have long publication histories. For instance, of the 13 criminology serials ranked the highest according to impact factor from 1981—2004, WSU Libraries currently receives 11 of them. The majority of these serials are available in electronic format, though some are still available in print.

Faculty and students have both on-campus and off-campus access to a number of indexes to journal literature in criminal justice, including Criminal Justice Abstracts and National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts. Access to databases in related includes PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and MEDLINE. All of these databases have access to at least some full-text.

3. Anticipated Trends

As the new bachelors program in forensic science continues to grow, more research materials may be needed to support the program. Also, as the masters program continues to offer online courses, there may be a need for more monographs and serials in electronic format that may be accessed from off-campus. Faculty may continue to demand full-text books and articles in electronic format for instant desktop delivery. Finally, the following topics have been identified as emerging interest in the criminal justice field: situational crime prevention, qualitative research strategies, cyber crime, and financial crimes.

B. Scope of Coverage

1. Chronological Focus

Emphasis is placed on current works dealing with contemporary criminal justice issues and practice. However, occasional acquisitions will be made of historical and seminal works as needed, primarily by request of the criminal justice faculty.

2. Geographic Focus

Works related to the practice of criminal justice in the United States will be the primary focus of the collection. Special emphasis will be placed on materials related to the State of Kansas and the Midwest. Secondary emphasis is placed on materials from Great Britain. Materials on criminal justice as practiced in other countries may also be of value, and will be collected selectively.

3. Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on current journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, etc.), government publications, and professional association publications. Proceedings and conference papers are collected selectively. The number of monographs and serials in electronic format will continue to increase. Video formats (ex. DVD) are being requested more often and will be purchased when requested by faculty and if the budget allows. Graduate, upper division textbooks and popular works are collected selectively.

4. Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will not be collected unless it is the sole format available. Lower level textbooks are usually not collected. To minimize duplication of resources, collected/selected works and journal reprints are avoided.

5. Publication/Imprint Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials. Older materials, such as seminal works, will be added selectively.

6. Place of Publication

Primary emphasis will be placed on materials published in the United States and Great Britain. Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7. Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected. Materials in other languages will be collected selectively, primarily at the request of faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

A broad range of criminal justice materials is collected. Special emphasis is placed on criminology, policing, corrections, criminal law and jurisprudence, and forensic science. Other areas of interest include: research methods in criminal justice, police behavior and training, offender decision making, situational crime prevention, terrorism, human rights, and international security. (See Appendix A for details)

D. Subjects Excluded

None.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Cooperative efforts such as the Kansas Regents Library Database Consortium (RLDC) allow for cooperative purchases and substantial discounts on electronic resources. The criminal justice collection at WSU Libraries is supplemented by other Kansas universities with criminal justice, criminology, or law programs including Washburn University, Friends University, the University of Kansas, and Kansas State University. These collections may be searched through online catalogs and accessed through interlibrary loan or on-site visits.

Segments of WSU Library’s collection related to criminal justice research include anthropology, psychology, sociology, chemistry, biology, ethnic studies, and government documents.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Collection development policies in the areas of anthropology, psychology, sociology, ethnic studies, biology, and chemistry affect WSU Library’s research collection for criminal justice.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Evaluation of the Criminal Justice Collection—Please see Appendix C.

H. Other Factors

None.

Appendix A—Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Divisions, Categories, & Subjects

Present

Collecting

Level (CL)

Desired

Collecting

Level (GL)

HV 6001-6034 Criminology (General) C1 C1
HV 6035-6197 Criminal Anthropology C1 C1
HV 6201-6249 Criminal Classes C1 C1
HV 6250 Victimology C1 C1
HV 6251-7221 Crimes. Offenses C1 C1
HV 7231-7427 Penology (General) C1 C1
HV 7428 Social Work with Delinquents & Criminals C1 C1
HV 7431 Crime Prevention Methods C1 C1
HV 7551-8069 Police, Detectives, Constabulary C2 C1
HV 8073-8080 Investigation of Crimes B B
HV 8081-8099 Private Detectives C2 C2
HV 8130-8280 Police: by region or country C2 C2
HV 8290 Guards. Watchmen C2 C2
HV 8301-9025 Prisons. Penitentiaries. Punishment and Reform C1 C1
HV 9051-9230 Juvenile Delinquency. Reform Schools C1 C1
HV 9261-9430 Reformation of Adult Prisoners C1 C1
HV 9441-9920 Penology by region or country C2 C2
K 237-487 Jurisprudence C1 C1
K2100-2385 Courts. Procedure C1 C1
K 3150 Public Law C1 C1
K 5000-5570 Criminal Law & Procedure C1 C1
Z 5703 Bibliographi    

APPENDIX B – EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL)  -- existing strength of collection  (required) Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal  (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate  (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. COLLECTING LEVEL CODES*

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A                 Comprehensive Level

B                Research Level (doctoral)

C1              Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2              Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D                Basic Information Level

E                Minimal Level

NC              Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code:

 

A             Comprehensive Level.   

A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field.  This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.

 

B             Research Level.

A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources--  in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.

 

C1           Advanced  Study  Level.  

A  collection  which  is  adequate  to  support  the  course  work  of  advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works  of  more  important  writers,  selections  from  the  works  of  secondary  writers,  a  selection  of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject.

 

C2           Basic Study Level.   

A collection  which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs (as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.

 

D             Basic Information Level.  

A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.

    E        Minimal Level.

A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.

 

    NC      Not Collected.  

A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.

  * The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

Curriculum & Instruction

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Department of Curriculum & Instruction offers degrees at both the Bachelors and Masters levels for both pre-service and in-service teachers.  It also provides several licensure, endorsement and certificate programs.  Programs of study include:

•     Undergraduate Teacher Education Program

Includes early childhood unified (birth through grade 3), elementary education (grades K-6), middle school (grades 5-8), and secondary school (grades 6-12).

•     Advanced Endorsement Programs

Includes Special Education endorsements in adaptive (mild to moderate disabilities), functional (severe and multiple disabilities), gifted (advanced) and early childhood unified (birth through grade 3) education; reading specialist; library media specialist; and TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages).

•     Alternative Certification

Also called “Transition to Teaching,” this program allows students with majors in content areas where there are teacher shortages at the middle and high school levels to be employed while they complete teacher certification requirements.

•     Masters of Education in Curriculum and Instruction (M.Ed.)

Includes a thesis or portfolio requirement. Emphasis is on reflective inquiry, with each student selecting a specific subject area for specialization.  This program is offered both on-campus and at several distance sites in Kansas each year.

•     Masters in Special Education (M.Ed.)

Includes emphases in adaptive, functional, gifted, and early childhood unified education.  A thesis or portfolio is required.

•     Graduate Certificates

Certificates are available in the following areas:  Educational Technology (includes coursework on the use of computers in education, the integration of technology in the classroom, and the use of technology as a communication tool); Literacy; and National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS).

•     Professional Development Schools

A collaboration between WSU and the Wichita Public Schools, this program allows students to gain extensive, multi-semester, field experiences in schools at the elementary, middle and secondary levels.

•     Online Courses

Numerous C & I courses are currently offered completely online.  In March of 2007, the Department received approval from the Higher Learning Commission to pursue an online Masters degree in Curriculum & Instruction.  They also approved a future online Master of Arts in Teaching degree.

•     Programs in Development

An Urban Teacher Education Program will be piloted in Fall 2007.  A cooperative program in Rural Education is in process with Cowley County Community College.

2. Collection Description

Monographs:  

The Library’s monograph collection currently contains over 47,000 titles in the core Library of Congress call number area for Education -- “L.”  The majority of these titles fall within the LB (Theory and Practice of Education) and the LC (Special Aspects of Education) call number areas, with LB holding the highest number of titles (over 25,000), followed by LC (over 17,000).  Thousands of additional relevant titles are held in other parts of the Library collection, in subject areas such as Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, Pediatrics, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Juvenile and Young Adult Literature, and Library Science, as well as in the many subject areas that are taught by our teachers, such as geography, chemistry, literature, languages, history, art, music, etc. The Library provides access to over 800 electronic books in various areas of education.

Journals:  

The Library maintains print subscriptions to over 160 journals related to Curriculum & Instruction, and access to over 600 education journals in full text through direct subscriptions, database subscriptions, and those freely available through the Internet.  A substantial number of additional paper and full text electronic subscriptions are maintained in related subject areas.  Faculty have indicated that increased access to electronic journals in this subject area is very important.

Databases:  

Students and faculty have both on-campus and off-campus access to indexes to the journal literature in this subject area.  The ERIC database is the primary index to research in Curriculum & Instruction.  Departmental faculty have indicated that ERIC is the most important index for their teaching needs.  Researchers can also use databases such as Education Full Text, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Sociological Abstracts, Social Sciences Abstracts, Social Work Abstracts, Mental Measurements Yearbook, Health and Wellness Resource Center, and Dissertation Abstracts.  Faculty have indicated that ERIC, PsycINFO, and the Social Sciences Abstracts are the most important databases for their research needs.

3. Anticipated Trends

Faculty in the Curriculum & Instruction Department have identified numerous emerging trends in their fields of teaching and research.  Those trends centered around the needs of exceptional students, classroom management techniques, and literacy.  Specific topics included:  poverty in the schools; mainstream classrooms; inclusion; accommodation of diverse students; differentiated instruction; gifted and special needs students; English language learners (ELL) and ESOL; cultural diversity; cultural proficiency of teachers, positive behavior supports; phonological awareness; fluency; vocabulary development; professional development schools; urban and rural education; educational technology; and global learning.

Faculty also indicated that current and electronic journals were of utmost importance to both their teaching and research needs.  In light of the upcoming development of the online Masters degree in Curriculum & Instruction and the Master of Arts in Teaching degree, electronic access to both journals and books in Curriculum & Instruction will be increasingly important.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Emphasis is placed on works dealing with contemporary issues and practice.  However, materials that provide information on the history of education and educational reform movements (especially in the United States) are also of value, and will be collected selectively.

2.  Geographic Focus

Works related to Curriculum & Instruction as they are practiced in the United States will be the primary focus of the collection.  As the educational systems in other countries are quite different from the United States, materials from these countries will be collected when they are deemed to add to the overall understanding of the subject area.  Materials on Global Education are an important aspect of the collection.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, etc.), and government publications. Both paper and electronic formats will be collected, with electronic formats becoming increasingly important, especially for journals.  Videos and DVD’s will be collected at the request of faculty.  Proceedings and conference papers will be collected selectively.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will be collected only when that is the sole format available.  Textbooks are not normally acquired, but may be purchased from time to time to provide broad overviews of some subject areas.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials; older materials will be added very selectively.

6.  Place of Publication

Primary focus will be placed on materials published in the United States.  Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.  Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected.  Materials in other languages will be collected at the request of faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels (See Appendix A for Details)

While a broad range of subjects is collected, special emphasis is placed on the following subject areas: principles and practice of teaching (pedagogy); learning theory; education research; reading, language arts, and literacy; classroom management; diversity and multicultural education; discrimination in education; special education; learning disabilities; all educational levels (early childhood, elementary, intermediate, and secondary); higher education; education reform; and assessment.

D. Subjects Excluded

Classroom textbooks and textbook series (such as Follett or McGraw-Hill Education).

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

The Wichita Public Schools Library Resource Center (Joyce Focht Instructional Support Center) is open to the public, and “supports the curriculum of the district with books, professional and reference materials.”  WebCat, the online catalog of the Wichita Public School Libraries, is available for searching. Students also have access to the collections of the Wichita Public Library, and may have access to materials in the libraries of the schools at which they are student teaching.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Collection Development policies related to the following subject areas would have an impact on the Library’s research collection for Curriculum & Development:  Juvenile and Young Adult Literature; Psychology; Sociology; Social Work; Pediatrics; Communication Sciences and Disorders; Library Science; Music; Art; Literature; Foreign Languages; Mathematics; Biology; Geology; Chemistry; Physics; Geography; Kinesiology & Sport Studies; Women’s Studies; and History.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Kinesiology & Sport Studies (for Physical Education)

H. Other Factors

None

APPENDIX A – SPECIFIC SUBJECTS COLLECTED (WITH COLLECTING LEVELS)

LC Class Divisions, Categories & Subjects CL GL
L 7-991 Education (General) C1 C1
LA 5-2396 History of Education C1 C1
   LA 173-186 Higher Education C1 C1
   LA 201-398 United States C1 C1
LB 5-3640 Theory and Practice of Education C1 C1
   LB 5-45 General C1 C1
   LB 51-885 Systems of individual educators C2 C1
   LB 1025-1050.75 Teaching (Principles and practice) C1 C1
      LB 1028.3 Educational Technology C1 C1
      LB 1049.9-1050.75 Reading C1 C1
   LB 1050.9-1091 Educational psychology (collected under the Counseling, Educational, and School Psychology CD Policy) NC NC
   LB 1101-1139 Child Study (collected under the Counseling, Educational, and School Psychology CD Policy) NC NC
   LB 1139.2-1602 Early Childhood, Kindergarten, and Elementary education C1 C1
      LB1567 Rural Education (see also LC 5146-5148)    
   LB 1603-1696.6 Secondary education, High schools C2 C1
   LB 1705-2286 Education & training of teachers & administrators C2 C2
   LB 2300-2430 Higher education C1 C1
   LB 2799-2799.3 Educational consultants & consulting NC NC
   LB 2801-3095 School administration & organization (Collected under the Educational Leadership CD policy) NC NC
   LB 3201-3640 Facilities, hygiene, school life E E
LC 8-6691 Special Aspects of Education C1 C1
   LC 8-59 Forms of Education (home, private, public, etc.) C2 C2
   LC 59 Public school education C1 C1
   LC 65-245 Social aspects of education C1 C1
      LC129-139 Compulsory Education C1 C1
      LC 142-148.5 Attendance, dropouts C1 C1
      LC 149-161 Literacy, illiteracy C1 C1
      LC 215-238.4 Community and the school C2 C1
   LC 251-951 Moral and religious education E E
   LC980-1099.5 Types of education (Liberal, career, cooperative, multicultural, etc C1 C1
      LC 1090 Global education C1 C1
   LC 1200-1203 Inclusive education C1 C1
   LC 1390-5160.3 Education of special classes of person C1 C1
      LC 2630-2638 Asian Americans C2 C1
      LC 2667-2698 Hispanic Americans C1 C1
      LC 2699-2913 African Americans C1 C1
      LC 3701-3740 Bilingual education (Materials for English language learners-ELL-are primarily classified in PE 1128 .A2) C2 C1
      LC3950-4806.5 Exceptional children and youth, special education C1 C1
         LC 3991-4000 Gifted children and youth C1 C1
         LC4001-4806.5 Children and youth with disabilities, learning disabled C1 C1
   LC 5101-5141 Urban Education C1 C1
   LC 5146-5148 Rural Education (see also LB 1567) C2 C1
   LC 5161-5163 Fundamental Education C1 C1
   LC 5201-6660.4 Adult Education C1 C1
   LC 6681 Education and travel D D
   LC 6691 Traveling educational exhibits E E
LD 13-7501 Individual Institutions--United States (WSU theses and dissertations are classified here) D D
LE 3-78 Individual Institutions --America (except US) E E
LF 14-5627 Individual Institutions--Europe E E
LG 21-961 Individual Institutions--Asia, Africa, Indian Oceanic Islands, Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands E E
LH 1-9 College and school magazines & newspapers D D
LJ 3-165 Student fraternities and societies, US D D
LT 6-501 Textsbooks E E
KF 4102.5-4243 Education Law E D
PZ 5-6 Juvenile Literature (Collected under the Juvenile and Young Adult Literature CD Policy) NC NC

APPENDIX B – EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

 

 

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL)

existing strength of collection  (required) Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal  (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC)

current collecting level or growth rate  (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA)

commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. COLLECTING LEVEL CODES*

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A                  Comprehensive Level

B                Research Level (doctoral)

C1              Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters) C2  Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D                Basic Information Level

E                Minimal Level

NC              Not Collected

 

The following is a detailed definition of each code:

A             Comprehensive Level.   

A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field.  This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.

B             Research Level.

A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources--  in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.

C1           Advanced  Study  Level.  

A  collection  which  is  adequate  to  support  the  course  work  of  advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works  of  more  important  writers,  selections  from  the  works  of  secondary  writers,  a  selection  of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject.

C2           Basic Study Level.   

A collection  which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs (as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.

D             Basic Information Level.  

A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.

E             Minimal Level.

A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.

NC          Not Collected.  

A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.

* The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Dance

A. Purpose of Collection

1.       Program Information

A part of the School of Performing Arts, the dance program offers a Bachelor’s degree of Fine Arts in Performing Arts/Dance.  The program emphasizes modern dance with strong supportive classes in ballet and jazz.  Course offerings are designed to train and educate dance students pursuing a professional or liberal program.  Additionally, programs are structured to allow students from other academic disciplines to enroll in dance techniques courses to gain an understanding of dance and contribute to physical fitness. There are currently no graduate degree programs in dance.

In the Fall 2003 semester there were 34 Dance majors and approximately 440 students from all parts of the university enrolled in dance classes.  The dance program is an accredited member of the National Association of the Schools of Dance.

2.       Collection Description

Collection holdings were compared against the bibliography contained in A Core Collection in Dance, edited by Mary E. Edsall, 2001.  This bibliography is the first work to list core books, video materials and periodicals in the areas of dance.  Periodicals are not discussed here, as their acquisition is tied to different budgetary constraints.  The results show that Wichita State’s holdings currently contain only 46% of all sources listed (excluding periodicals).  This is expected in some areas, such as dance preservation (10%), in which WSU offers no courses related to this specialization.  Other collecting areas are currently under supported.  For example the subdivision of Modern and Postmodern Dance, the most emphasized component of the WSU dance program, is notably deficient as the library owns only 48% of the listed core titles.  In the area of Ballet, another major area of study at WSU, the library owns only 58% of the recommended titles.  The low percentage of titles owned overall appears to have developed over a long period of time due to a shrinking budget, economic inflation, and an expansion in the range of programs offered.

See Appendix C.

Edsall, Mary E., ed.  A Core Collection in Dance.  Chicago: The American Library Association, 2001.

3.       Anticipated Trends

As all undergraduate dance students are required to fulfill two semesters of modern dance and one semester of ballet, along with a minimum of 24 hours of modern dance technique, the collection should continue to build a solid foundation of works on modern dance and ballet.  However, as the program offers such diverse course offerings to such a broad range of students, the collection should also reflect the strong needs of these programs.  Notably, a small collection of recordings, specifically related to dance should be developed and maintained as funds allow.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.      Chronological Focus

Modern dance is emphasized.  Historical works are collected more selectively to support the Modern and Ballet dance history classes.

2.       Geographic Focus

Western Europe and North America are emphasized, but important works in other geographic areas are acquired without limitations.

3.       Formats and Materials Collected

Acquisition is based on content.  As the subject matter is highly visual, videos are of prime importance. Monographs, serials and sound recordings will also continue to be maintained.

4.       Formats and Materials Not Collected

None

5.       Publication/Imprint Dates

Current publications are emphasized but older publications will be acquired to fill in collection gaps. Antiquarian collecting is not pursued.

6.       Place of Publication

Place of publication is not a limiting factor.

7.       Languages Collected

English is preferred.  French and Italian are appropriate for historical treatises.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D. Related Collection Evaluations

Please refer to: Collection Evaluation 2003 – Dance containing a description of the 2003 Faculty Survey and an analysis of Interlibrary Loan statistics.  This document may be found in the Collection Development and Subject Librarian offices.

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

The Wichita Public Library offers a selection of dance videos, primarily classical ballet productions, dispersed throughout the library branches.  Students may also be referred to the performing arts collection at the central branch of the Wichita Public Library for monographs.

F. Other Factors

Appendix A – Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

Appendix B – Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

Appendix C – Collection comparison to A Core Collection in Dance

 

APPENDIX A – SPECIFIC SUBJECTS COLLECTED (WITH COLLECTING LEVELS)

 

 

LC Class

 

GV1580-1605

Divisions, Categories and Subjects

 

 

Dancing (Dance in General)

CL

 

 

C1

GL

 

 

C1

GV1607-1615

GV1617-1619

GV1622-1625

GV1626-1641

GV1643-1688

GV1689-1703

GV1705-1713

GV1715-1728

GV1746-1771

GV1779-1786

GV1787-1790

GV1791-1799

Ancient

Modern

North America Latin America Europe

Asia

Africa

Australia, Pacific Islands

Social & Ballroom Dancing, Round & Square Dances

Theatrical Dancing

Ballet

Various Special Dances

C2

C2

E E E E E E E E D E

C2

C1

D D D D D D D

C2

C1

D

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX B – EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX C – COLLECTION COMPARISON TO A CORE COLLECTION IN DANCE, ed, by Mary E. Edsal

General Reference

51%

Historical Overviews

87%

Dance Biographies and Autobiographies

62%

Geographical Traditions: Africa

53%

Geographical Traditions: Americas

45%

Geographical Traditions: Asia

18%

Geographical Traditions: Europe

33%

Geographical Traditions: Mediterranean and Near East

17%

Geographical Traditions: Oceania

36%

African American Dance

64%

African Caribbean Dance

53%

Latin American Dance

30%

Spanish Dance

33%

Sacred and Liturgical Dance

18%

Western European Renaissance and Baroque Dance

37%

Ballet

58%

Modern and Postmodern Dance

48%

Jazz Dance

53%

Tap Dance

16%

European and American Social Dance: Folk Dancing

24%

European and American Social Dance: Square, Old Time, Contra, and Round Dancing

16%

European and American Social Dance: Ballroom, Club Dancing, Competition Dancing, and Dance Sport

26%

Variety Dance: Minstrel

75%

Variety Dance: Vaudeville

67%

Variety Dance: Burlesque

20%

Dance in Commercial Theatre and Movies

24%

Television and Video Dance

12%

Choreography

40%

Dance Production and Administration

37%

Dance Notation

30%

Dance Criticism

     77%

Dance Theory

64%

Dance and Related Arts

53%

Dance Education

51%

Ethnology and Anthropology of Dance

61%

Dance Science and Medicine

58%

Dance Therapy

36%

Somatic Studies

27%

Dance Preservation

10%

Total number of titles listed:  1453

Total number of titles owned: 664 (46%)

English

A. Purpose of Collection

1.         Program Information

The Department of English of the Fairmount College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers the Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Master of Fine Arts (Creative Writing) degrees. In addition, it participates in two interdisciplinary certificate programs, Film Studies and Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Students may concentrate in literature, creative writing, or English education. Those seeking the MFA specialize in fiction, nonfiction, or poetry.  Those seeking the MA follow one of three plans: Plan A emphasizes literature, composition, and pedagogy. Plan B emphasizes research, scholarly writing, and the study of literature.  The emphasis of Plan C is on creative writing. The department does not offer a doctorate.

There are 18 permanent faculty members in the Department with teaching and research interests in language and linguistics, all periods of British and American literature, drama, folklore, creative writing, and film.

The majority of the 210 undergraduates majoring in English concentrate in literature. Creative writing is the second most popular concentration. The department’s creative writing programs, both undergraduate and graduate, are strong in the areas of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. In the graduate program, MFA candidates outnumber MAs.

Since all entering freshmen must take English composition and many of the department’s literature courses are options in the General Education program, virtually every undergraduate student on campus takes at least one English class, regardless of major.

2.         Collection Description

The English Language and Literature collection exists to support the teaching and research needs of the Department of English faculty and students. Materials are housed in Ablah Library. Included in the collection are monographs, scholarly journals, literary magazines, films on DVD or videocassette, non- music sound recordings, microforms, and electronic databases. Audiobooks are not collected; however, they are available at no cost to users through the Kansas State Library’s Overdrive program.

The library’s monograph collection contains titles in the following Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH): Philology and Linguistics (P), English language (PE), Literary history (PN), English literature (PR), and American literature (PS). The library’s holdings are strongest in the PR and PS classifications. The holdings in Philology and Linguistics, while not extensive, are of high quality and the collection is kept current in the areas of sociolinguistics, language acquisition, and comparative linguistics.

In Literature, the collection contains the works of major and critically-acclaimed authors writing in English from all time periods. All genres of literary work are collected. Emphasis has been on American and English literature, but increasingly, select literary work from other anglophone countries is added.

Literary biographies, theory and criticism, and literary history are also collected.

The library subscribes to a sizeable collection of scholarly journals and literary (also known as little) magazines, numbering over 190 specifically in the fields of English language and literature in print. Twenty-one journals are available electronically in English language, 48 in American literature, and 55 in English literature of the British Isles and the rest of the anglophone world. Additionally, the library keeps bound volumes of journals from the 18th through 20th centuries which are important to the study of literature and culture.

Several periodicals are available on microform. The most significant recent addition to the collection is the microfilm set of Early English Books.

Databases useful for the study of English language and literature are available to the WSU community from both on campus and off. These include the Literature Research Center, Literature Online (LION), the Modern Language Association International Bibliography, and, through LION, the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature. The Humanities Full Text index through WilsonWeb and Academic OneFile through Gale are also useful to researchers in literature and language.

While the library does own some electronic books related to English studies, the faculty generally prefers to use print.

The University Libraries acquired or is in the process of acquiring some substantial materials and resources from FY2006 onward. These include the addition of two British literary studies journals; approximately 50 “classic” American films on DVD, purchased with a gift; 49 personal memoir graphic novels; the ProQuest database Literature Online; and Early English Books on microfilm.

3.         Anticipated Trends

The collection of Medieval and Renaissance texts and criticism will continue to increase to support the Medieval and Renaissance Certificate program established in 2006. In keeping with increased interest in multiculturalism at both the departmental and university levels, works on or by women, racial or ethnic minorities, homosexuals, and other traditionally marginalized groups are increasingly collected. The English Department recently added courses in Postmodern literature, Race Relations in America, African- American literature, women’s literature, and Irish literature (in connection with a Travel Study course). The new collection of personal memoir graphic novels will help support the established course in popular culture. Three new Americanists were added to the English Department’s faculty in Fall 2007 and it is expected that requests for American literature and criticism will increase.

B.         Scope of Coverage

1.         Chronological Focus

All time periods are collected.

2.         Geographic Focus

The collection focuses on the British Isles and the United States, including indigenous peoples of North America.  Literature and some criticism from English Canada is also collected to a lesser extent. Authors writing in English from former British colonies or protectorates such as India, Jamaica, Kenya, Hong Kong, and Australia are also collected.

3.         Formats and Materials Collected

The bulk of the English language and literature collection is made up of books and print journals. This includes bibliographies, literary guides, handbooks, casebooks, specialized dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, concordances, literary biographies, essays, novels, poetry, short stories, creative nonfiction, plays, filmscripts, literary theory and criticism, writing theory, and linguistic theory. Material is collected when it meets certain criteria:

•      The work is relevant to courses taught at Wichita State University;

•      The work is of interest because of literary qualities, author, genre, experimental nature, etc. to the WSU community;

•      The work shows promise of enduring literary worth;

•      The work is of high quality and deals with topics related to Kansas or the Midwest;

•      The author is associated with the English Department, including current and former faculty and current and former students of the Creative Writing Program.

Material requested by departmental faculty, even when not fitting into the categories above, will be added to the extent practicable.

4.         Formats and Materials Not Collected

The only expressly excluded format is audiobooks (regardless of format). E-books, whether for use on a personal computer or on portable devices, are collected only in rare circumstances and are not favored by the English Department faculty. Literary criticism of authors whose work is not in the library’s collection, chapbooks, self-published work, textbooks, collections of aphorisms, most anthologies, and rhetoric handbooks for use in instruction are generally not collected.

5.         Publication/Imprint Dates

Current publications are emphasized. Older publications are added to fill gaps in the collection or when requested by faculty, students, or staff and deemed appropriate to the collection. Currency is not a critical factor in the study of English literature.

6.         Place of Publication

There is no strict limit to place of publication, but material published in the United States is generally preferred for cost reasons. While linguistic studies and literary criticism are often published simultaneously in the UK and the US, British fiction, poetry, plays and so on are not. The bibliographer would normally wait until a US edition is published to add it to the collection. Materials published exclusively in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and other Anglophone countries are collected only selectively.

7.         Languages Collected

Materials are acquired in modern English, old or middle English, and translations of old or middle English into modern English. Very few materials are collected in Welsh, Irish, or Gaelic.

C.         Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D.         Subjects Excluded

No subjects are expressly excluded from the collection, but certain areas outside the purpose of the collection would be acquired only if they fit within the selection criteria discussed elsewhere. These subjects include erotica, romance novels, genre fiction, pop fiction, light verse, and humor.

E.         Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Many areas relate to English literature and language, including philosophy, history, religion, women’s studies, ethnic studies, and classical languages. The library participates in interlibrary loan programs and exchanges material with Kansas State University, the University of Kansas, and other institutions.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Individual collection policies for the subjects named in Section E may be found in the Collection Development and Research Services Group offices and online at http://library.wichita.edu/colldev/subjectpoliciesalpha.htm.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

The collection evaluation for English Language and Literature is available in the Collection Development and Research Services Group offices.

H. Other Factors

Special Collections has several collections of interest to scholars of English literature. See http://specialcollections.wichita.edu.

 

 

Appendix A. Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Subject Collecting Level
P 101-410 Language, Linguistic Theory, Comparative Grammar C2
PE 1-3729 English C1
PN 1-6790 Literature (General) C1
PN 1-44 Periodicals, Yearbooks, Societies, etc. C1
PN 45-57 Philosophy. Esthetics C1
PN 59-72 Study and teaching D
PN 80-99 Criticism C1
PN 101-245 Authorship C1
PN 172-239 Technique, Literary composition, etxc. C1
PN 441-1009.5 Literary History C1
PN 451-497 Biography D
PN 500-519 Collections D
PN 597-694 Special Relations, movements, and currents of literature C1
PN 683-687    Legends C2
PN 688-691    Poetry C1
PN 692-693    Prose. Prose fiction C1
PN 695-779    Modern C1
PN 715-749    Renaissance (1500-1700) C1
PN 801-820    Roman Literature C1
PN 841    Black Literature (General) C1
PN 842    Jewish literature in various languages C2
PN 851-(884)    Comparative Literature C1
PN (905)-1008    Folk Literature C1
PN 980-995    Fables C1
PN 1008.2-1009.5    Juvenile Literature C2
PN 1010-1525 Poetry C1
PN 1031-1049    Theory, philosophy, relations, etc. C1
PN 1065-1085    Relations to, and treatment of, special subjects C1
PN 1110-1279    History and Criticism C1
PN 1301-1333    Epic Poetry C1
PN 1341-1347    Folk Poetry C1
PN 1351-1389    Lyric Poetry C1
PN 1600-3307 Drama C1
PR 1-9680 English literature C2
PR 1-56 Literary history and criticism C1
PR 57-78 Criticism C1
PR 111-116 Women authors C1
PR 125-(138.5) Relations to other literatures and countries C2
PR 161-488 By period C1
PR 171-236    Anglo-Saxon (Beginnings through 1066) C1
PR 251-369    Medieval. Middle English (1066-1500) C1
PR 401-488    Modern C1
PR 421-(429)    Elizabethan Era C1
PR 431-(439)    17th century C1
PR 441-(449)    18th century C1
PR 451-(469)    19th century C1
PR 471-(479)    20th century C1
PR 481-488    21st century C1
PR 500-614 Poetry C1
PR 621-744 Drama C2
PR 750-890 Prose C1
PR 821-890    Prose fiction. The novel C1
PR 901-907.2 Oratory D
PR 908 Diaries D
PR 911-918 Letters C2
PR 921-928 Essays C1
PR 931-938 Wit and Humor D
PR (951)-981 Folk literature C2
PR 1098-1369 Collections of English literature D
PR 1490-1799 Anglo-Norman period. Early English. Middle  
PR English  
PR 2199-3195 English renaissance (1500-1640)  
PR 3291-3785 17th and 18th centuries (1640-1770)  
PR 3991-5990 19th century, 1770/1800-1890/1900  
PR 6000-6049 1900-1960  
PR 6050-6076 1961-2000  
PR 6100-6126 2001  
PR 8309-9680 English literature: Provincial, local, etc.  
PS 1-3576 American Literature  
PS 126-138 Biography, memoirs, letters, etc.  
PS 147-152 Women authors  
PS 163-173 Treatment of special subjects, classes  
PS 185-231 By period  
PS 185-195 17th-18th centuries  
PS 201-217 19th century  
PS 221-228 20th century  
PS 229-231 21st century  
PS 241-286 Special regions, states, etc.  
PS 241-255 North  
PS 261-267 South  
PS 271-285 West and Central  
PS 301-326 Poetry  
PS 330-353 Drama  
PS 360-380 Prose  
PS 370-380 Prose fiction  
PS 400-408.2 Oratory  
PS 409 Diaries  
PS 410-419 Letters  
PS 420-429 Essays  
PS 430-439 Wit and Humor. Satire  
PS (451)-478 Folk literature  
PS 490 Juvenile literature (General)  
PS 501-689 Collections of American literature  
PS 530-536.3 By period  
PS 537-574 By region  
PS 538-549 North  
PS 551-559 South  
PS 561-572 West and Central  
PS 580-619 Poetry  
PS 593 By form  
PS 601-617 By period  
PS 623-(635) Drama  
PS 642-659.5 Prose (General)  
PS 651-659.2 By Period  
PS 660-668.2 Oratory  
PS 666-668.2 By period  
PS 669 Diaries  
PS 670-678.2 Letters  
PS 680-689 Essays  
PS 700-3576 Individual authors  
PS 700-893 Colonial Period (17th and 18th centuries)  
PS 991-(3390) 19th Century  
PS 3500-3549 1900-1960  
PS 3550-3576 1961-2000  

Appendix B. Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

 

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Ethnic Studies

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Ethnic Studies program at WSU is interdisciplinary with a focus on diversity and cross-cultural communication. Students in this program also learn about the unique experiences of major U.S. ethnic groups and how those experiences shape current race relations.

Current course offerings include the following: Introduction to Ethnic Studies; Fundamentals of Cross-Cultural Communication; Ethnic Women in America; Martin Luther King; Ethnic America, 1500-1924; The Black Family; The Native American; Issues in the Chicano Community; Ethnic America in the 20th Century; Dealing with Diversity; Prominent Ethnic People in the Making of America; The Black Experience in America; Native American Tribal Systems; The Black Child; The African-American Male; Urban Seminar; Issues in Minority Aging; Advanced Cross-Cultural Communications; Cross-Cultural Communication Theory; and Concepts of Cross-Cultural Communications. Dealing with Diversity is a popular course that is required for the Criminal Justice major.

This program offers undergraduate degrees through a field studies major and as a Bachelor of General Studies (BGS). The field major requires 18 hours of coursework including several required courses. A minor in ethnic studies is also available to undergraduates and consists of at least 18 hours of coursework. The BA program was eliminated in 2003 due to low enrollment and small number of faculty.

2. Collection Description

There is no LC call number range specifically for ethnic studies. Being an interdisciplinary field, ethnic studies materials are found under many headings, including B—BX (philosophy, psychology, and religion), E and F (history of America), G (geography and anthropology), H (social sciences), and PN (literature). Much of the Ethnic Studies program is focused on aspects of African American history and experience (including slavery). These subjects correspond to the LC call number ranges E184.5—185.97 and E441—453. The Libraries has a good number of recommended books in these ranges, with a few small gaps. The titles currently in the Libraries’ collection reflect some emerging trends in the ethnic studies field, including the influx of Latino and African immigrants and the increasing number of multi-racial/multi-ethnic children. Although the number of titles in the Libraries’ collection compares favorably to peer institutions, more materials on these emerging trends should be added.

WSU Libraries carries a good number of core sociology journals, many of which have some relevance to ethnic studies. Out of the 446 “core” titles on the current serials list from Sociological Abstracts, 219 (49%) are currently in print or electronic formats. Although 49% may seem low, many of the titles missing from WSU Libraries’ collection are in languages other than English. The collection is supplemented by holdings in related social sciences disciplines.

Some of sociology journals in the WSU Libraries’ collection are well-regarded and have long publication histories. For instance, of the 16 sociology serials ranked the highest according to impact factor from 1981—2007, WSU Libraries currently receives 12 of them. All but one of these serials are available in both print and electronic formats.

Faculty and students have both on-campus and off-campus access to a number of indexes to journal literature in ethnic studies, including Sociological Abstracts, Social Sciences Full Text, and the Spanish-language Informe. Access to databases in related areas includes PsycINFO, America's Historical Newspapers, and Project Muse. Many of these databases have access to at least some full-text.

3. Anticipated Trends

The Ethnic Studies program is currently in transition, recently losing full-time faculty. Some instructors have been pulled from other parts of the university to temporarily fill the gaps. The Libraries will need to stay aware of future changes in this program. Some of the courses, including Martin Luther King, The Black Family, Dealing with Diversity, and Advanced Cross-Cultural Communications are currently being taught at least partly online. Therefore, there may be a need for more monographs and serials in electronic format that may be accessed from off-campus. Faculty may continue to demand full-text books and articles in electronic format for instant desktop delivery. The cross- disciplinary nature of ethnic studies demands that materials continue to be added in many areas, including history, psychology, and social work. Finally, the following topics have been identified as emerging interest in the ethnic studies field: influx of Latino and African immigrants to the U.S.; increase in multi-racial/multi-ethnic children.

B. Scope of Coverage

1. Chronological Focus

No time period is excluded from selection, although emphasis is placed on current works dealing with contemporary ethnic studies issues.

2. Geographic Focus

The focus is on racial and ethnic groups from the United States.

3. Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on current journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, etc.), government publications, and professional association publications. Proceedings and conference papers are collected selectively. The number of monographs and serials in electronic format will continue to increase. Video formats (ex. DVD) are being requested more often and will be purchased when requested by faculty and if the budget allows. Graduate, upper division textbooks and popular works are collected selectively.

4. Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will not be collected unless it is the sole format available. Lower level textbooks are usually not collected. To minimize duplication of resources, collected/selected works and journal reprints are avoided.

5. Publication/Imprint Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials. Older materials, such as seminal works, will be added selectively.

6. Place of Publication

Primary emphasis will be placed on materials published in the United States. Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7. Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected. Materials in other languages will be collected selectively, primarily at the request of faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

A broad range of ethnic studies materials is collected in a variety of fields including psychology, anthropology, history, sociology, and literature. Special emphasis is placed on the experiences and history of African Americans, U.S. Latinos, and Native Americans. Diversity and cross-cultural communications are also emphasized. (See Appendix A for details)

D. Subjects Excluded

None.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Cooperative efforts such as the Kansas Regents Library Database Consortium (RLDC) allow for cooperative purchases and substantial discounts on electronic resources. The ethnic studies collection at WSU Libraries is supplemented by other Kansas universities with similar programs including the University of Kansas and Kansas State University.

These collections may be searched through online catalogs and accessed through interlibrary loan or on-site visits.

Segments of WSU Libraries’ collection related to ethnic studies research include anthropology, psychology, sociology, history, literature, and government documents.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Collection development policies in the areas of anthropology, psychology, sociology, history, and literature affect WSU Libraries’ research collection for ethnic studies.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Evaluation of the Ethnic Studies Collection (Appendix C) and Evaluation of the Criminal Justice Collection.

H. Other Factors

None.

Appendix A--Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Divisions, Categories, & Subjects CL GL
E 51-99 Indians of North America C2 C2
E 184. M5 Mexican Americans C2 C2
E 184.5-185.98 Afro-Americans C2 C2
E441-453 Slavery (Revolution to Civil War) C2 C2
HT 1501-1595 Races (social groups; race relations C2 C2

Appendix B--Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

Finance, Real Estate and Decision Sciences

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences Department (FREDS) in the Barton School of Business offers degrees at the Bachelor level in Finance.  Degrees which place an emphasis on Real Estate and Decision Sciences related areas are offered at the Bachelor level.  An MBA is offered with a Finance or Decision Sciences related concentration.  Students pursuing business degrees/concentrations/interests in Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences (FREDS) at the undergraduate and graduate level should receive the maximum benefit from this collection.

Within FREDS, Finance students prepare for careers in investments, corporate finance, investment banking, and other financial institutions.  Real Estate students prepare for careers in property development, managing a real estate company, and real estate investing. Students with an interest in Decision Sciences pursue careers in e-business, Management Information Systems, and other technology focused areas.

The collection should help support faculty research interests.  In other areas, many patrons including students and community users take interest in FREDS materials on the stock market or real estate.

2. Collection Description

WSU Libraries presently has over 9,800 Finance (HG1-9999) related items. These items are part of a total collection of business monographs in excess of 87,000.  In addition, WSU Libraries offers access to 77 finance serials, over 20 real estate serials, and approximately 10 decision sciences serial publications.  A significant proportion of these periodicals are available electronically. There is considerable interdisciplinary overlap between FREDS and other business subject areas.

Some electronic resources that appeal to FREDS faculty include:

ABI/Inform, Business and Company Resource Center, Compustat PC Plus, Lexis-Nexis Academic Universe, Management and Organizational Studies: A Sage Full-Text Collection, Mergent, PsycINFO, Reference USA, Standard and Poor’s Net Advantage, Value Line Online, and Westlaw Campus Research.  Among these, ABI/Inform, Lexis-Nexis Academic, and Management and Organizational Studies: A Sage Full-Text Collection are considered to be most useful among FREDS faculty.

3. Anticipated Trends

Online access will continue to create value for WSU Libraries clients.  Recently added databases such as Management and Organizational Studies: A Sage Full-Text Collection and Value Line Online have overall been well received by FREDS faculty. Nonetheless, the traditional book remains an integral part of the FREDS collection. Weak areas in the collection outlined in Part C of this policy need to be addressed. Items will be purchased in those areas as funding and new publications become available.

Decision Sciences and its related areas are expected to grow.  New majors/concentrations within Decision Sciences and MIS are possible.  To anticipate this change, a greater emphasis is placed on materials dealing with group decision making, technology, and other Decision Sciences related areas.  Faculty indicate an interest in more MIS journals and note this as an area of increasing importance. Online access is highly valued by faculty, particularly for retrieving journal articles.  As a whole, journals are a highly valued format for FREDS faculty.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Emphasis is on works dealing with the middle to late 20th and early 21st centuries. Works dealing with earlier periods are less frequently collected.

2.  Geographic Focus

Major emphasis is placed on the United States (with particular interest in Wichita and Kansas).  This is especially true for the Real Estate collection. Secondary emphasis is placed on the EU, Japan, China, India, and industrialized countries. Information on developing countries is collected selectively.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Scholarly monographs, books, journals, publications of professional associations (i.e. Urban Land Institute), government and trade statistical publications (i.e. Federal government and international organization publications), encyclopedias, dictionaries, indexes, and databases.  Graduate, upper division textbooks and popular works are collected selectively.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Lower division textbooks are not collected.  In general, proceedings are rarely collected.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Date of Publications: Emphasis is on current works, with retrospective materials purchased selectively.

6.  Place of Publication

Primary emphasis will be placed on materials published in the United States. Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.  Languages Collected

Material is collected only in the English language.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details) Materials in this policy support Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences. Within Finance, subjects such as Finance – Biography and Investing in Developing Countries need improvement. Within Real Estate, encyclopedia, dictionaries, and Industrial Real Estate need updating.  Within Decision Sciences, Teams in the Workplace is an area that is important and underrepresented in the collection.  MIS journal offerings need some improvement.  In Finance other significant interests include: Corporate Finance, Municipal Securities, Public Finance, and Taxation.  Within Real Estate, Housing Economics and Insurance are important interests.  In Decision Sciences, Group Decision Support Systems, Human Side of Computing, Information Technology Acceptance and Impacts, Management of Information Systems, Online Behavior and Supply Chain Management represent significant areas.  Other faculty research interests outside of Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences include: Business, Constitutional and Employment Law, E-commerce, General Insurance, and Torts.

D. Subjects Excluded

Materials focusing on “how to get rich quick” in Finance and Real Estate are not typically collected.  Materials by authors offering “free money” are also to be avoided. In addition, books presenting research and making scholarly claims must be backed up with thorough bibliographies and research.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Regional libraries play an important role in supporting collections in Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences.  The University of Kansas and Kansas State University both offer Finance degrees and studies related to Decision Sciences. Both KU and KSU offer valuable collections that relate to WSU Libraries’ FREDS collection.

Another related collection is found at the Business and Technology Center at the Central Branch of the Wichita Public Library. While the offerings at Wichita Public Library are different from an academic library, some public library resources in Real Estate and Finance are prescient to FREDS students and faculty.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Accounting, Economics, Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship as well as other areas related to business are affected by the Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences Policy.  In addition, Decision Sciences has some overlap with Industrial & Manufacturing Engineering.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Finance, Real Estate, and Decision Sciences Evaluation

H. Other Factors

None.

Appendix A

SUBJECT-FINANCE LC CLASSES CL GL

Finance-General (works of a general nature

or with at least two specific subject divisions.

Also, includes biographies.)

HG 9999 C1 C1
History of Finance HG 171-173 C2 C1
Commodities HF 1040-1054 C1 C1
International Finance HG 3810-4000 C1 C1
Fundraising HG 177 C2 C2
Personal Finance HG 179 C2 C2
Monetary Theory HG 201-1496 C2 C1
Banking (General)

HG 1501-1611

HG 1621-1778

C1 C1
Bank Management & Administration HG 1615-1616 C1 C1
Banks and Financial Institutions HG 1811-3550 C1 C1
Credit HG 3691-3769 C1 C1
Foreign Exchange HG 3810-4000 C1 C1
Financial Management HG 4001-4285 C1 C1
Capital Budgeting HG 4028 C1 C1
Investments HG 4501-6051 C1 C1
Trade HF 1001-1027 C1 C1
Tariffs, Free Trade, and Protectionism HF 1701-2701 C1 C1
Trust Services HG 4301 C1 C1
SUBJECT-REAL ESTATE LC CLASSES CL GL

Real Estate-General (also includes publications

with interdisciplinary content, housing 

economics and insurance.)

HD 111-1394 C1 C1
Real Estate Business HD 1365-1382 C2 C2
Real Estate Development HD 1390-1393.5 C2 C2
Real Estate Investment HD 1375-1390 C1 C1
Real Estate Management HD 1394 C1 C1

Land Use (includes planning, design, zoning,

etc.)

HD 111-1375 D C2
SUBJECT-DECISION SCIENCES LC CLASSES CL GL

Decision Sciences-General (also includes

publication with interdisciplinary content

and group decision making.)

HD 30-70 C1 C1
Management Science (including MS)

HD 20.4-30.25

T 56-58

C1 C1
Industrial Management HD 20.4-70 C1 C1
Product Management

HD 30.27-31

HF 5415.15

C1 C1
Electronic Spreadsheets HF 5548-5679 C2 C2

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

French

A. Purpose of Collection

1.  Program Information

French is one of the languages taught within the Modern Languages and Literatures department here at WSU.  At the moment, two professors, Dr. Brigitte Roussel (medieval and early modern literature) and Dr. Wilson Baldridge (modern literature) handle the mainly undergraduate level language courses with a few literature classes thrown in.  In addition, Dr. Marat Santallov teaches French language classes.  Undergraduate classes are offered in Elementary French, Intermediate French, Intermediate French readings, Intermediate Conversation and Cooperative Education. Graduate classes are taught in French Phonetics, Advanced Conversation, French Literature of Africa and the Caribbean in translation, French Civilization: Middle Ages to the Restoration, Contemporary French Civilization, Renaissance French Literature, 17th Century French Literature, 18th Century French Literature, 19th Century French Literature, 20th Century French Literature and Contemporary French Literature.

The main areas of research in this area are late medieval and early modern literature (specializing in feminist literature in this regard) in addition to modern literature.  Once again, the new faculty member’s research area has yet to be determined.

The students taking French are from a variety of disciplines across the WSU campus including English literature, religion, gender studies, old world history, philosophy and political theory.

2.  Collection Description

The French collection consists of paper books, some journals, database access and limited e-book access.

Due to our collaboration with the two professors noted above, the Libraries’ book holdings in this regard are quality selections even if they are smaller than other MCLL areas such as Spanish.  Two analyses illustrated this fact.  The first test compared our holdings to the bibliography in The Oxford Companion to French Literature. In terms of works prior to 1970, we had half of the English language reference items and a few original language entries.  The second test, using the recently published A Short History of French Literature rendered positive results showing that we have 85 percent of the core works written in English for this area.[i]

We tend not to collect dissertations, essay collections or conference proceedings for this area, as it is an undergraduate program.  However, these items are available upon request.

Our journal holdings in this regard are not as strong as they could be.  Interdisciplinary journals as well as those literary journals in English provide the bulk of our coverage.  We do have a few French language journals, which we are still receiving and several historical runs up in the general stacks.  However recent budget cuts have taken their toll on those items.  Running our historical and present-day collections up against the MLA Bibliography reveals that our original language collections are weak in this regard, not even having core journals in most regards and only a few of the English language serials.  As such, researchers rely heavily on Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery for most of their materials.  These journals need to be protected whenever possible in future serials reviews.

Database access remains limited to mostly English language works.  The only access we have for French language works comes the MLA Bibliography.  That database, however, provides citations and abstracts only.  While there are links to full text, they are from other databases and then, only those that we subscribe to.  Full text access to articles in English comes from JSTOR (retrospective coverage) and Project Muse (mostly the last fifteen years’ of publication runs).  Humanities Index and InfoTrac Web’s Expanded Academic provide some additional coverage for English works. Yet in the latter’s case, only 1 out of every 4 academic works is available in full text.

E-Book coverage remains in flux as well.  Netlibrary does not have a great deal of French literature, historical or cultural works in its holdings.  With the possible addition of the ACLS Humanities E-Book and other packages may offer possibilities in this regard.

3.  Anticipated Trends

As with other areas within the Humanities, two items will drive our collecting efforts for French: access and budgets. The balance between print and electronic media may help to bridge several gaps in the future. Certainly, in terms of electronic journals, we could stand to benefit if publishers provide affordable foreign language journal packages here in the United States.  Even so, French journals would rank behind Spanish in this regard.  The same can be said for French monographs and source materials.  Fortunately, the interdisciplinary coverage in JSTOR and Project Muse does assist in bridging this gap.  Once again, however, this balance can change depending upon budgets and which databases we can acquire/hang on to in the future.  While the Libraries probably will not increase its holdings in foreign language journals or databases in a large way, our access to materials in English could benefit from adding JSTOR’s Arts & Humanities II and III packages to our repertoire.  Cost could determine whether we keep Project Muse beyond 2005 so we need to plan accordingly.  A switch to EBSCOHost Expanded Academic could increase access as well.  In terms of e-book coverage, an increase in Netlibrary, ACLS History E-Book Collection and/or other collections in this regard can only help narrow this gap while providing quality materials to our patrons.

With French, due to the collaboration between Dr. Roussel, Dr. Baldridge and the liaison librarians, we have strong core collections for the most part, emphasizing quality over quantity.  Given the budgetary situation and priorities both for the MCLL department and the Libraries as a whole, this activity will need to be monitored carefully to insure a balance between a general collecting base, meeting faculty research needs and satisfying patron’s needs.  To their credit, these two professors make it a point to balance all three of these components in their requests for books and our discussions.  Also, since French literature does touch on the other subject areas across campus noted above, we do need to keep some literary works (mainly in translation but with some original holdings) available for patron use as well.  These issues are concerns for the French CD area.

B.     Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

For French literature, the primary chronological areas are Medieval, Renaissance, Early Modern and Modern.  This could be expanded depending upon the interests of the new faculty hire. Other areas can be collected depending upon available budgetary resources; the importance of the analyzed work(s) within the scope of French literary history in general and the quality of the scholarship in that work.  In any event, that activity would never exceed C2 or D Levels as explained in Appendix B.

2.  Geographic Focus

The primary geographic focus is France.  Other areas include Quebec, the Low Countries (medieval—see Burgundian holdings) and the Maghrib (Northern Africa).  Once again, the new person’s research interests could affect the geographic coverage as well.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

For French literature, the collecting efforts include printed works both in English and French.  The following formats are collected:  books, journals and serials.  As noted above, when the appropriate opportunity arises to investigate electronic access for French language journals and electronic works, we will do so.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Although the focus will primarily be on those formats and materials noted in Section 3 above, other formats will be considered according to the relevance to the overall major and department (MCLL), courses of study, areas of faculty research/teaching, and overall continuity of the collection.  As mentioned in Section 3, such endeavors will be subject to availability, overall collecting priorities and budgetary constraints.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Most purchases will be recently published works although out of print works will also be considered. Retrospective projects conducted between faculty members and the subject librarians will be considered as well depending upon available budget, collection priorities, the time involved and the project scope.

6.   Place of Publication

All academic publishers’ works are considered.  However, some publishers’ works will tend to be purchased more than others.  For French, Peter Lang and Librarie Droz are two such cases. Distributors such as BNA and Schoenhoff’s will also be considered.  In all cases, the work’s overall quality not just the publisher or its reputation will determine a purchase.

7.   Languages Collected

Works in this field are collected in both English and French.  All secondary works (unless requested by the faculty members) are collected in English.  Primary sources can be collected in other languages.  However again, foreign language sources will be collected in translation whenever possible.  If a faculty member requests that a source be acquired in the original language, every effort will be made to get the work as permitted by availability and available funds.

C.      Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

Subject LC Class CL
Fr. Language-Provencal PC D
French Dialects PC D
Provencal Language & Lit PC D
French Literature PQ C2
Collections of French Lit. PQ C2
French Literature to 1525 PQ D
French Literature-16th century PQ C2
French Literature-17th century PQ C2
French Literature-18th century PQ C2
French Literature-19th century PQ C2
French Literature-20th century PQ C2
French Literature-Other areas PQ D
French Literature-Pop. Literature PQ C2
French Literature-Canadian PQ C2
French Literature-West Indies PQ D
French Literature-Africa PQ C2

D.     Subjects Excluded

There are no excluded subjects.  Although some may only be collected at a minimal (re: level as spelled out in Appendix B.

E.      Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Any French literature collecting effort should interact with those from the other MCLL subject areas for budgetary reasons. Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, Gender Studies, Philosophy, Religion and other Humanities areas.

F.       Related Collection Development Policies

Any French literature CD Policy should interact with those from the other MCLL subject areas for budgetary reasons. this occurs due to all foreign languages being under the same fund code (FLN2D). Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, Gender Studies, Philosophy, Religion and other Humanities areas.

G.     Related Collection Evaluations

See E and F above.

H.     Other Factors

Access to French literature sources (largely in English language interdisciplinary sources) is available through Project Muse and JSTOR.  Bibliographic citations can be found in the MLA Bibliography and Humanities Index (WilsonWeb) .

 

Appendix A—Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Line Number Division, Categories and Subjects CL  AC GL  PC
PC 2001-3761 LLL86 French Language, Provencal Language & Literature D D
PC 2700-3171 LLL87 French Dialects D D
PC 3201-3495 LLL88 Provencal Language & Literature D C2
PQ 1-3999 LLL88.5 French Literature C2 C2
PQ 1-789 LLL90 French Literature-History & Criticism C2 C2
PQ 1100-1297 LLL91 Collections of French Literature C2 C2
PQ 1300-1595 LLL92 French Literature-Old French to 1525 D C2
PQ 1600-1709 LLL93 French Literature-16th Century  C2 C2
PQ 1710-1935 LLL94 French Literature-17th Century C2 C2
PQ 1947-2147 LLL95 French Literature-18th Century C2 C2
PQ 2149-2551 LLL96 French Literature-19th Century C2 C2
PQ 2600-2651 LLL97 French Literature-1900-1960 C2 C2
PQ 2660-2686 LLL98 French Literature-1961- C2 C2
PQ 791-806 LLL99 French Literature-Folk Poetry & Chapbooks D D

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

German

A.  Purpose of Collection

1.  Program Information

German is one of the languages taught within the Modern Languages and Literatures department here at WSU.  Until his retirement in June 2004, Dr. Dieter Saalmann handled the mainly undergraduate level language courses with a few literature classes thrown in.  These courses include elementary German, Intermediary German, Continuing German, German conversation, Culture of Contemporary Germany and Advanced German conversation.

Dr. Saalmann’s area of interest covered nineteenth and twentieth century German literature.  This could change depending upon the MCLL department’s next hire.

The students taking German are from a variety of disciplines across the WSU campus including history, the humanities, fine arts, physical sciences and social sciences.

2.  Collection Description

The German collection consists of paper books, some journals, database coverage and a little electronic book coverage. Due to our collaboration with Dr. Saalmann, the Libraries’ book holdings in this regard are heavily weighted between 1720 and the present.  When checked against The Cambridge History of German Literature, that part of the collection is strong, holding 50 percent of the titles listed in the bibliography.  However, the other eras of German literature contain sparse holdings at best.  For ancient and medieval, the WSU Libraries had 10-15 percent of the core titles.  That number jumps to 20 percent for the Enlightenment.

The libraries tend not to collect conference proceedings, essay collections or dissertations as German is an undergraduate program.  However, these items would be available through Interlibrary Loan or for purchase as funds and departmental collecting priorities permit.

Our journal holdings in this regard are not as strong as they could be.  Interdisciplinary journals as well as those literary journals in English provide the bulk of our coverage.  We do have a few German language journals but recent budget cuts have taken their toll on those items.  The collections on hand include the Zeitschrift fur Deutsche Philologie and the Zeitschrift fur Germanistik.  However, as a careful search of the MLA Bibliography’s title list reveals, our collection lacks major research titles and even many core journals, forcing researchers to resort to Interlibrary Loan for most of their materials.

Our database coverage centers around English titles.  The MLA Bibliography provides our only bibliographic listing of German scholarship.  Any full text access will be in English and that comes from JSTOR, Project Muse, Wilson Web Humanities and a small amount in InfoTrac Expanded Academic.

In terms of electronic books, we do not have very many texts in this regard.  NetLibrary does not focus on this area. Fortunately, in terms of history and academic works, the ACLS Humanities E- Book may provide some assistance in this regard.

For more information on our holdings, please refer to the attached “German Languages and Literatures Collection Analysis”.

3.  Anticipated Trends

As with other areas within the Humanities, two items will drive our collecting efforts for German: access and budgets. The balance between print and electronic media may help to bridge several gaps in the future. Certainly, in terms of electronic journals, we could stand to benefit if publishers provide affordable foreign language journal packages here in the United States.  Even so, German journals would rank beneath Spanish and French in this regard due to the MCLL’s priorities vis-à-vis faculty research and credit hour production.  The same can be said for German monographs and source materials.  Fortunately, the interdisciplinary coverage in JSTOR and Project Muse does assist in bridging this gap.  However, we will need to watch this divide carefully, due to both shifting budgets and the introduction of new e-book, e-journal and database packages on the market.  Certainly, the addition of the ACLS Humanities E-Book shortens the gap a bit, albeit again, with more English titles.  If WSU acquires JSTOR’s Arts and Humanities II and III packages, this coverage would improve greatly again.

With German, due to the collaboration between Dr. Saalmann and the liaison librarians, we have strong collections in some regards and spotty areas in others.  Given the budgetary situation and priorities both for the MCLL department and the Libraries as a whole, this activity needs to be monitored carefully.  Dr. Saalmann requested a great deal for his subject area of expertise but not for the rest of the collection.  (There are a couple of courses in the Undergraduate Catalog for those areas.)  This trend could be troublesome for the collection when the next faculty member is hired.  However it should be noted that the upcoming hire provides an opportunity to possibly develop other pieces of this collection.  Also, since German literature does touch on other subject areas across campus, we do need to keep minimal works (in translation) available for patron use as well.  These areas include history, philosophy, religion, fine arts, English, the physical sciences and the social sciences. These issues are concerns for the German CD area.

B.  Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

For German literature, the primary chronological area has been nineteenth and twentieth century German literature. This focus could change depending upon the next German faculty member’s research interests. Other areas can be collected depending upon available budgetary resources; the importance of the analyzed work(s) within the scope of German literary history in general and the quality of the scholarship in that work.  In any event, that activity would never exceed C2 or D Levels as explained in Appendix B

2.  Geographic Focus

The primary geographic foci are Germany and Austria.  Again, these could change depending upon the new faculty member’s research interests and teaching load.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

For German literature, the collecting efforts include printed works both in English and German.  The following formats are collected:  books, journals and serials.  As noted above, when the appropriate opportunity arises to investigate electronic access for German language journals and electronic works, we will do so.

4.   Formats and Materials Not Collected

Although the focus will primarily be on those formats and materials noted in Section 3 above, other formats will be considered according to the relevance to the overall major and department (MCLL), courses of study, areas of faculty research/teaching, and overall continuity of the collection.  As I said in Section 3, such endeavors will be subject to availability, overall collecting priorities and budgetary constraints.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Most purchases will be recently published works although out of print works will also be considered.  Retrospective projects conducted between faculty members and the subject librarians will be considered as well depending upon available budget, collection priorities, the time involved and the project scope.

6.  Place of Publication

All academic publishers’ works are considered.  However, some publishers’ works will tend to be purchased more than others.  For German, Camden House and Peter Lang are the top publishers.  In all cases, the work’s overall quality not just the publisher or its reputation will determine a purchase.

7.   Languages Collected

Works in this field are collected in both English and German.  All secondary works (unless requested by the faculty members) are collected in English.  Primary sources can be collected in other languages.  However again, foreign language sources will be collected in translation whenever possible.  If a faculty member requests that a source be acquired in the original language, every effort will be made to get the work as permitted by availability and available funds.

C.   Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

These are the areas collected in German Literature:

 

Subject LC Class Current Holdings
Old High German Lang/Lit. PF E
Old Saxon Lang/Lit. PF E
German Lang-Mid. High PF E
German Lang-Early Modern PF E
German Lang-Dialects PF D
Collections of German Lit PT D
German Literature 1050-1500 PT E
German Literature 1500-1700 PT E
German Literature 1700-1860 PT C2
German Literature 1860-1960 PT B
German Literature 1961 PT C1
German Literature-Hist of Folk PT C1
German Literature-Provincial PT D
German Literature-Austria PT C2
German Literature-Switzerland PT C2
Ger. Literature-Czech/Russia PT D
Ger Literature-Outside of Eur. PT D
Ger. Literature-Low Ger. Lit. PT D
Ger. Literature-Pop Lit. PT D

D.  Subjects Excluded

There are no excluded subjects.  Although some may only be collected at a minimal (re: level as spelled out in Appendix B.

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Any German literature collecting effort should interact with those from the other MCLL subject areas for budgetary reasons.  Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, Philosophy, Religion and other Humanities areas.

F.  Related Collection Development Policies

Any German literature CD Policy should interact with those from the other MCLL subject areas for budgetary reasons.  This occurs due to all foreign languages being under the same fund code (FLN2D).

In addition, comparative literature affects German and can be considered as well.   Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, Philosophy, Religion and other Humanities areas.

G.  Related Collection Evaluations

See E and F above.

H.  Other Factors

Access to German literature sources (largely in English language interdisciplinary sources) is available through Project Muse and JSTOR.  Bibliographic citations can be found in the MLA Bibliography and Humanities Index (WilsonWeb) .

Appendix A-Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Line Divisions, Categories, & Subjects CL GL
PF 3801-3991 LLL188 Old High German Language & Literature E D
PF 3992-4000 LLL189 Old Saxon Language & Literature E D
PF 4043-4350 LLL190 German Language-Middle High German E D
PF 4501-4596 LLL191 German Language-Early Modern E D
PF 5000-5844 LLL192 German Language-German Dialects D D
PT 1-4899 LLL193 German Literature D D
PT 1-871 LLL194 German Literature-History & Criticism D C2
PT 1100-1485 LLL195 Collections of German Literature D D
PT 1501-1695 LLL196 German Literature-1050-1450/1500 E D
PT 1501-1695 LLL197 German Literature-1500-ca. 1700 E D
PT 1701-1797 LLL198 German Literature-1700-ca. 1860/70 C2 C2
PT 1799-2592 LLL199 German Literature-1860/70-1960 B B
PT 2600-2659 LLL200 German Literature-1961 C1 C1
PT 2660-2688 LLL201 German Literature-History and Criticism of Folk D D
PT 2881-951 LLL202 German Literature-Provincial & Local in Germany D D
PT 3701-3807 LLL203 German Literature-Austria C2 C2
PT 3810-3829 LLL204 German Literature-Switzerland C2 C2
PT 3860-3878 LLL205 German Literature-Czechoslovakia & Russia E D
PT 2830-3858 LLL206 German Literature-Outside of Europe D D
PT 3900-3971 LLL207 German Literature- Low German Literature D D
PT 4801-4897 LLL208 German Literature-Popular Literature D D
APPENDIX B -  Explanation of Collecting Levels
     1. Collecting Levels
          Current Collection (CL) - existing strength of collection (required)
          Collection Goal (GL) - desired or target collecting goal (required)
          Acquisitions Commitment (AC) - current collecting level or growth rate
          Preservation Commitment (PA) - commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)
   
 

2. Collecting Level Codes

     Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes: 

          A       Comprehensive Level

          B       Research Level (doctoral)

          C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

          C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

          D       Basic Information Level

          E       Minimal Level

          NC     Not Collected

     The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
  • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus

Human Performance Studies

A.  Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Department of Kinesiology & Sport Studies in the College of Education reorganized into two units in the Fall of 2007 – the Department of Sport Management (formerly Sport Administration) and the Department of Human Performance Studies.  The Department of Human  Performance  Studies  offers  Bachelor  degree  programs  in  Exercise  Science, Physical Education, and Athletic Training.  A Masters degree is also offered in Exercise Science.

The Exercise Science program “involves the exploration and understanding of the functional and  structural   mechanisms   underlying   human   performance   in   all   its manifestations from fundamental motor skills to sustained and demanding exercise.” Graduates may find employment in a variety of fields, such as physical therapy, health administration, personal training, and more.   The Physical Education program offers coursework and training in both K-12 and Pre-K-12 education, and is accredited by NCATE. The Athletic Training program “incorporates academic course requirements with clinical experiences to encompass the entry-level professional qualifications of the athletic trainer.” Athletic trainers serve as members of health care teams in a variety of settings, ranging from schools to professional sports, and manage health care problems such as athletic injuries, physical therapy, prevention of injuries, emergency care, sports medicine, etc.  The program is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

The Department of Human Performance Studies also maintains The Center for Physical Activity and Aging (CPAA) and the Human Performance Laboratory (HPL).  The CPAA is engaged in research on exercise and aging, and offers physical activities and fitness testing to older adults in the community.  The HPL provides students and faculty with opportunities for research and study in the areas of kinesiology, exercise biomechanics, exercise physiology, cardiac physiology, and exercise prescription.   Finally, as part of the Department’s mission to support the physical activity experiences of the University Community, one-hour courses in popular sporting activities such as golf, bowling, weight training, rock climbing, pilates, swimming and more are offered through the Physical Education Activity Program (PEAP).

The Human Performance Studies collection serves the needs of the department’s six permanent faculty members and nearly 250 students in its undergraduate and graduate programs.  The majority of Undergraduate students are enrolled in the Exercise Science program.

2. Collection Description

The Library’s monograph collection currently contains over 7,000 titles in the core Library of Congress  call  number  range  relevant  to  Recreation,  Leisure,  Physical  Education,  and Sports Administration (GV).   The collection also includes well over 1,000 additional monographs in related areas such as Nutrition (QP 141), Kinesiology and Exercise (QP 303), Sports Medicine and Injuries (RC & RD), and Physical Therapy for Sports (RM). These numbers do not include the thousands of titles held in other relevant parts of the collection, such as Medicine, Physical Therapy, Curriculum and Instruction, Business, etc., that are also used by students and faculty in Exercise Science, Physical Education, and Athletic Training.

The Library maintains subscriptions to nineteen journals closely aligned with Human Performance Studies.  Sixteen of these are also available electronically and in full text.  A substantial number of additional paper and full text electronic subscriptions are maintained in related subject areas.  For example, an additional twenty-nine electronic journals are available in the Curriculum & Instruction collection for those in the Physical Education program, and several hundred electronic journals are available in the Library’s medical collection for those in Exercise Science.   Overall, the journal collection for Human Performance Studies needs to be improved.   Faculty have cited a limited number of electronic subscriptions and a lack of international journals as weaknesses of the journal collection.

Researchers have both on-campus and off-campus access to a number of indexes to the journal literature. MEDLINE, ERIC, SportDiscus Full Text, and the Physical Education Index are the primary indexes for this discipline.  Other useful indexes maintained by the Library include Health & Wellness Resource Center, and Expanded Academic ASAP (general database with good coverage of the areas within Kinesiology & Sport Studies). Faculty have indicated that MEDLINE, ERIC, and Health & Wellness Resource Center are the most important indexes for their research.  For their teaching needs, faculty cited ERIC, SportDiscus Full Text, and MEDLINE as being of greatest importance.  They have also expressed an interest in acquiring an electronic subscription to the Physical Education Index to replace the current paper copy subscription.

3. Anticipated Trends

While a core collection of materials on Athletic Training have been acquired, it is anticipated that some additional materials will be needed to support this new degree program. Faculty in the department have indicated that employers are beginning to expect more clinical education, the ability to work with special populations, and a better understanding of working conditions from students in Human Performance Studies. In terms of desirable formats for materials, Faculty have indicated that the trend is towards electronic  and  current  journals  as  the  most  important  kinds  of  publications  for  their research, followed closely by Internet resources and indexes to periodicals.  For their teaching needs, they have identified Internet resources as most important, followed by current  journals  and  textbooks,  and then  electronic  journals  and  books  other  than textbooks.  These priorities should be kept in mind as new materials are acquired.

B.  Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Emphasis is placed on works dealing with contemporary issues and practice.  However, materials that provide historical information are also of value, and will be collected selectively.

2.  Geographic Focus

Works focusing primarily on the United States will be collected.  Materials related to other countries will be purchased selectively.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on current journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes  to  periodicals,  encyclopedias,  handbooks,  etc.),  and  government  publications, where applicable.  Both paper and electronic formats will be collected, with a priority placed on the electronic format.   Materials such as videos and DVD’s will be collected at the request of faculty.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will be collected only when that is the sole format available. Textbooks are not normally acquired, but may be purchased from time to time to provide broad overviews of some subject areas.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials; older materials will be added selectively.

6.  Place of Publication

Primary focus will be placed on materials published in the United States.   Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.  Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected.  Materials in other languages will be collected at the request of faculty.

C.  Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels -- (See Appendix A for Details)

Materials are collected in all three areas that support programs in Human Performance Studies—Exercise Science, Physical Education, and Athletic Training.  In Exercise Science, faculty identified exercise for adults, aerobic and anaerobic exercise, older adults, exercise physiology, kinesiology, muscle strength/endurance, nutrition, physical therapy, rehabilitation, and strength training as subjects of major importance.  In Physical Education, faculty have indicated that special attention needs to be paid to equity issues in athletics, and to physical education teacher education.   In Athletic Training, the development of a core collection of books and journals was identified as a top priority.  A basic collection of materials to support this new program has been purchased, but development of the collection in this area will be an ongoing process.

D.  Subjects Excluded

Materials on popular sports topics and sports figures will typically not be collected.  These should be purchased selectively with funds designated for undergraduate materials and the general collection.

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Regional  library  collections  that  support  the  Bachelor,  Master,  and  PhD  programs  in Physical Education, Exercise Science and Athletic Training at the University of Kansas, and those that support the Bachelor and Master degree programs in Exercise Science and Kinesiology at Kansas State University may supplement the WSU Library’s collection.

Other areas of the WSU Library collection that are of importance to research in Exercise Science, Physical Education, and Athletic Training include, but are not limited to, Theory and  Practice  of  Education,  Special  Education,  Business,  General Medicine,  Sports Medicine, Physical Therapy, Nutrition, and Kinesiology and Biomechanics.

F.  Related Collection Development Policies

Collection Development Policies related to all of the subject areas listed above would have an impact on the Library’s research collection for Human Performance Studies.

G.  Related Collection Evaluations

H.  Other Factors

None

Appendix A - Specific Subjects collected (with collecting levels)

LC Class Divisions, Categories, & Subjects CL GL
GV 1-200.66 Recreation leadership, Recreation centers, Outdoor life, etc. E E
GV 201-555 Physical education and training C1 C1
    GV 443     Physical education, elementary and middle school C1 C1
    GV 341, 343, 361-365     Physical Education, secondary C1 C1
GV 557-1570 Sports, Coaching, Sports Administration, Ball games, Track and field (collected primarily under the Sport Management Collection Development Policy) C2 C1
    GV 750-1198 Specific Sports-e.g., water sports, winter sports, baseball, basketball, soccer, football, golf, tennis, cycling, track, boxing, martial arts, etc. D D
GV1199-1570 Games, card games, board games etc. E E
GV 1580-1799.4 Daning (Collected under the Dance Collection Development Policy) E e
GV 1800-1860 Circuses, spectacles, etc. E E
QP 141-143 Nutrition C1 C1
QP 176 Nutrition and energy metabolism, oxygen consumption, etc. C1 C1
QP 301-303 Movement of the musculoskeletal system, physiology of exercise, biometrics, kinesiology C2 C1
RA 781 Exercise C2 C1
RC 1200-1299 Sports medicine, physiology, doping C1 C1
RD 97 Sports injuries C2 C1
RJ 133 Children and exercise C1 C1
RM 701 Physical therapy for sports C2 C2
TX 361 .A8 Sports Nutrition C1 C1

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus

Juvenile and Young Adult Literature

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Library’s Juvenile and Adult Literature collection supports the subject areas of children’s literature and young adult literature in the College of Education Curriculum and Instruction program, and provides materials for use by students enrolled in other Wichita State University programs leading to careers working with children.  To a more limited extent, the collection also serves as a resource for the children of Wichita State University students, faculty and staff.  Portions of the collection also have been used by staff at the Wichita State University Child Development Center and adult students at the University who seek to improve their proficiency in English as a second language.

Classes using this collection most directly:

CI 316  Children’s Literature

CI 616  Literature for Adolescents

Other classes:

CI 322  Strategies in Language Arts and Reading

CI 730  Curriculum in the School Library

CI 734   Literature-Based Reading Program

ENGL 346  American Multicultural Literature

2. Collection Description

This heavily used collection focuses on “best of the best” titles published for children and young adults each year (due to the substantial number of titles published for this audience each year the collection must be selective).  All titles are given a PZ classification number, and are located in the Ablah Library stacks.  A single copy of each title will normally be purchased, although additional copies may be purchased at the discretion of the bibliographer.  Most titles have been added to the collection in the last thirty years, although some older volumes are available.  Some outdated or controversial titles will stay in the collection to offer children’s literature students a historical perspective of this genre. Otherwise, this collection follows general deselection guidelines.

3. Anticipated Trends

For the last decade, additional emphasis in the collection has been devoted to providing a more multicultural selection of titles. This effort is expected to continue.  The first large digital archive of children’s literature (the International Children’s Digital Library) became available for public use in 2002.  Additional Internet based resources are expected to become available in the future.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

There are no chronological limits to the collection, although most titles added will have been published in the last ten years.  Limited retrospective purchasing may be directed to replacement purchases or for specific collection needs.

2.  Geographic Focus

The collection emphasis is on works published in the United States.  Works with Kansas coverage or by Kansas authors are acquired when funds are available.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

The primary format is hard cover monographs.  Some young adult literature is purchased in the paperback edition.  A limited number of titles are purchased in either board book or oversize (“big book” formats).

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

This is not a curriculum collection, so K-12 textbooks and materials intended to support classroom instruction at the K-12 level are not included in the Juvenile and Young Adult Literature collection. No children’s or teen magazines are included in the collection.  Due to the nature of use of our library materials certain formats are also not selected including: pop-up books, books with embedded computer chips or sound cards, and lift the flap books. Books that include moveable parts, audio books, or books that require individual power sources (such as batteries) or specialized equipment are also not added to the collection. A very selective group of graphic novels has been purchased on a trial basis, additional purchases in this format may be considered in the future pending Collection Development Department review of use of the collection and suitability as a long term format in the University Libraries.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

See chronological focus statement.

6.  Place of Publication

See geographic focus statement.

7.  Languages Collected

English is the predominate language of the collection.  Examples of picture books or easy reading books in other languages may be added occasionally.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

Fiction and non-fiction at all levels from pre-kindergarten through high school are included.   Primary concentration is on notable books for children and young adults in the following collecting areas: picture books, fiction, multicultural literature, science, easy fiction, social science and biography. “Big Books” (oversized books intended for use in front of a class or group) are also in the collection.

For the discipline of children’s literature, bibliographies, book lists and evaluative titles are added to both the general and reference collections.

D. Subjects Excluded

No subject area is excluded.  Titles included in the collection must be intended for a children’s or young adult audience.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

The collections of the Wichita Public Library system are an important local resource. Additionally, members of the university community employed by area school districts or involved in student teaching activity may have access to collections at area public or private schools.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Education policies.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Education policies.

H. Other Factors

Books awarded the following medals and honors will be purchased for the collection:

Randolph Caldecott Medal (medal winner and honor books) John Newbery Medal (medal winner and honor books)

William Allen White Children’s Book Award  (all books on annual master list) Bill Martin, Jr. Picture Book Award (all annual nominated books)

Coretta Scott King Award (medal winners and honor books) Pura Belprè Award (award recipient and honor books) Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal (award recipient)

Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature (award recipient)

If funds are sufficient, honor books for the Siebert and Printz Books should be purchased.  Within funding limitations, selected titles from the International Reading Association’s Children’s Choices, Teacher’s Choices, and Young Adult Choices will be purchased.

Review sources important to the selection process include:

 

Journals:  School Library Journal, Booklist, Horn Book, Multicultural Review, Book Links, ALAN Review, and Publisher’s Weekly.

Book lists: Best Books for Young Adults (American Library Association Young Adult Library Services Association), Children’s Choices (International Reading Association), Notable Children’s Books (American Library Association Association for Library Service to Children), Teacher’s Choices (International Reading Association), Young Adult Choices (International Reading Association).

Gifts

The Juvenile and Young Adult Literature collection welcomes gifts of books that are of l quality, within the scope of the Libraries’ collecting focus, do not duplicate current holdings, and enhance and support teaching and research at Wichita State University.

Nancy Deyoe, Wichita State University Libraries. October 2006

 

Appendix A – Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

 

Class Number          Area                                                    Current Collection

PZ5                             Fiction and non-fiction books                    C2 appropriate for students

grades 3 through 12

PZ6                            Picture books and easy readers                C2 appropriate for students

preschool through grade 2

 

APPENDIX B – EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL)  -- existing strength of collection  (required) Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal  (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate  (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Marketing and Entrepreneurship

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Department of Marketing and Entrepreneurship in the Barton School of Business offers degrees at the Bachelor level in Marketing and Entrepreneurship.     An MBA is offered with Marketing and Entrepreneurship concentrations.  Students pursuing business degrees/concentrations/interests in Marketing and Entrepreneurship at the undergraduate and graduate level should receive the maximum benefit from this collection.

The Center for Entrepreneurship is related to the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Collection.  It is a unique part of Wichita State University focusing on a variety of entrepreneurially minded activities.  As a result, entrepreneurship related materials take on a greater importance.  With individuals as diverse H. Lee Scott (CEO of Wal-Mart) and Jerry Greenfield (of Ben and Jerry’s Ice Cream fame) speaking at WSU, there is a growing role for entrepreneurship and related initiatives on campus.

Within Marketing and Entrepreneurship, Marketing students prepare for careers in marketing research, advertising, sales, and sales management.  Entrepreneurship students prepare for careers in new business start-ups, family business initiatives, and creative activities within larger corporations.

The collection should help support faculty research interests (see Part C for more detail on faculty research interests).  In other areas, many patrons including community users take interest in entrepreneurship materials relating to the creation of businesses or identifying new business opportunities.  Within marketing, advertising and other related fields hold some interest for community users.

2. Collection Description

The Marketing and Entrepreneurship Collection is a substantial part of a business monographs collection totaling over 87,000 items.  WSU Libraries offers access to over 55 marketing serials and roughly a dozen entrepreneurship periodicals.  A significant proportion of these periodicals are available online.  Interdisciplinary overlap in marketing and entrepreneurship exists within business subject areas.  This overlap also extends into some social sciences areas including communication. Some electronic resources that support Marketing and Entrepreneurship faculty include: ABI/Inform, Business and Company Resource Center, Campus Research, Econlit, Lexis-Nexis Academic, Management and Organizational Studies: A Sage Full-Text Collection, Mergent and Reference USA.

3. Anticipated Trends

Online materials are a growing focus at WSU Libraries.  Electronic access for journals and even e-books is growing.  While online access is important, print resources will continue to be an integral part of the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Collection.  Guerilla marketing appears to be an emerging trend.  Quality materials dealing with this subject matter will be added to the collection.  Franchising and family businesses will continue to be areas that expand in the collection.  Corporate biographies of businesses and important industry leaders will have a greater emphasis in the collection.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.    Chronological Focus

Emphasis is on works dealing with the middle to late 20th and early 21st centuries.  Works dealing with earlier periods are less frequently collected.

2.    Geographic Focus

Major emphasis is placed on the United States (with particular interest in Wichita and Kansas).  This is especially true for the Entrepreneurship Collection.  Secondary emphasis is placed on the European Union, Japan, China, India, and industrialized countries.  Information on developing countries is collected selectively.

3.    Formats and Materials Collected

Scholarly monographs, books, journals, publications of professional associations (i.e. American Marketing Association), government and trade statistical publications (i.e. Federal government and international organization publications), encyclopedias, dictionaries, indexes, and databases.  Graduate, upper division textbooks and popular works are collected selectively.

4.    Formats and Materials Not Collected

Lower division textbooks are not collected.  In general, proceedings are rarely collected.

5.    Publication/Imprint Dates

Date of Publications: Emphasis is on current works, with retrospective materials purchased selectively.

6.    Place of Publication

Primary emphasis will be placed on materials published in the United States.  Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.    Languages Collected

Material is collected only in the English language.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels (See Appendix A for Details)

Materials in this policy support Marketing and Entrepreneurship.  Areas within Marketing needing improvement include:

  • Social Marketing
  • Marketing – By region or country
  • Marketing – Data Processing
  • Marketing Channels
  • Marketing Research (companies/consulting)
  • Retail Trade – By region or country
  • Department Stores – By region or country
  • Marketing related biographies 

Areas within Entrepreneurship needing improvement include:

  • Entrepreneurship, Retail Trade
  • Franchises and Business
  • Success in Business

Significant areas of interest in Marketing include: B2B Marketing, Consumer Behavior, Cross-Cultural Comparative Research of Brand Equity, E-Commerce, Market Feasibility Studies, Marketing Analysis/Communication/Management, Sales/Retail, Selling and Sales Force Management, Services Marketing, Service Quality Management in Commercial Airline Passenger Services and Healthcare Services, and Sport/Recreation Marketing.

Within Entrepreneurship, Corporate Entrepreneurship, Family Business, Feasibility Analysis, Franchising, and Sport/Recreation Marketing are important interests. 

Other faculty research interests outside of the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Collection include: International Management/Strategies, Interpersonal Communication, Labour Force Trend Analysis, Supply Chain Management, and Technology Management.

D. Subjects Excluded

Materials focusing on “how to get rich quick” in marketing and entrepreneurship are not typically collected.  Materials offering “free money” are also to be avoided.  In addition, books presenting research and making scholarly claims must be backed up with thorough bibliographies and research.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Regional libraries play an important role in supporting collections in marketing and entrepreneurship.  The University of Kansas and Kansas State University offer Marketing degrees.  In addition, both KU and KSU offer valuable collections that relate to WSU Libraries’ Marketing and Entrepreneurship Collection.

The Business and Technology Center at the Central Branch of the Wichita Public Library is a local related collection.  While the offerings at Wichita Public Library are somewhat different from an academic collection, some marketing and entrepreneurship related resources from WPL are prescient to students and faculty researching within those areas.

Other comparable institutions identified by faculty include: the University of Nebraska at Omaha, the University of Dayton, the University of Missouri at Kansas City, and the University of Nevada at Las Vegas.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

These include collections and polices for Communication, Economics, Finance, Real Estate & Decision Sciences, Management Polices, as well as other areas related to business are affected by the Marketing and Entrepreneurship Policy.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Marketing and Entrepreneurship

H. Other Factors

APPENDIX A - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

SUBJECT - Marketing LC CLASSES

CL

GL

Marketing - General (works of a general nature or with at least two specific subject divisions)

HF 5410-5415.1

HF 5415.122-5415.5

C1 C1
Advertising HF 5822-5827 C2 C1
Consumer Behavior (Relates to Marketing Research HF 5415.3 C2 C1
Distribution/Logistics

HF 5415.6-5146

HF 5484-5495

HF 5761-5780

C2 C2
E-Commerce HF 5548.32 D C2
International Marketing HF 5415.12 C1 C1
Marketing Management HF 5415.13-5415.16 C2 C2
Marketing Research HF 5415.2-HF 5415.4 C2 C1
Marketing Strategy HF 5415 C2 C2
Pricing HF 5415.5-5417.5 C2 C1
Public Relations HD 59 C2 C1
Purchasing/Buying HF 5437 C2 C1
Relationship Marketing HF 5415.5 C2 C1
Retail

HF 5428-5430.6

HF 5460-5438.5

C1 C1
Sales Promotion HF 5438-5438.5 C1 C1
Selling HF 5438.5-5459 C1 C1
Wholesaling HF 5419-5422 C2 C1
SUBJECT-Entrepreneurship LC CLASSES CL GL
Entrepreneurship - General (works of a general nature or with at least two specific subject divisions)

HB 615

HD 62.25-62.7

C1 C1
Business Start-Ups/Ventures HD 62.5 C1 C1
Family Business HD 62.25 C2 C1
Franchising (Relates to Retail) HF 5429 C2 C1
International Entrepreneurship HD 62.4 C1 C1

 

APPENDIX B – EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL)  -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment  (AC)  -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. COLLECTING LEVEL CODES OR INDICATORS

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

 A                Comprehensive Level

 B                Research Level (doctoral)

C1               Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

      C2               Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

      D                 Basic Information Level

      E                 Minimal Level

      NC               Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code:

A  Comprehensive level

A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field.  This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.

B  Research level.

A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services – including electronic resources -- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.

C1  Advanced study level.

A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject.

C2  Initial study level

A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs (as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works or more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.

D  Basic level

A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works, historical surveys, important bibliographies, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.

E  Minimal level.

A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.

NC  Not Collected.  

A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.

* The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Management

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information Collected

The W. Frank Barton School of Business at Wichita State University grants undergraduate degrees with majors in management, human resources management, business administration, and international business. Undergraduates may also minor in management or business administration. Graduate students may earn a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree with a general focus or one with a concentration in international business. Graduate level degree programs leading to an Executive Masters of Business Administration or a Master of Science in Business are also offered by the Barton School of Business.

2. Collection Description

The Libraries’ collection in management consists of over 28,000 monographic and serial volumes. Subscriptions to roughly seventy periodicals are maintained. Access to additional titles, available in both full text and pdf versions, is facilitated by the electronic databases ABI/INFORM and Business and Company Resource Center.

The reference collection, now maintained primarily as a virtual collection and not a paper-based one, provides strong support to research efforts in management. Mergent Online provides access to the Mergent (formerly Moody’s) manuals, and allows direct downloading in spreadsheet formats. Standard & Poor’s NetAdvantage makes available the information formerly contained in the many products formerly included in the company’s library package. Business & Company Resource Center, in addition to its periodical content which is strong both in scholarly and trade literature, also provides access to brokerage house reports and includes as strong directory component. LEXIS Academic provides access to the full text of major newspapers published in the United States, case law at both the state and federal levels, in addition to legislative and administrative sources (e.g. state codes and administrative regulations). The Reference USA database includes basic information on over fifteen million business and its interface allows for sophisticated screening procedures.

3. Anticipated Trends

The ever increasing importance of globalization in business decision making will strongly influence to character, particularly the geographic character, of materials collected in support of management research. And as is true of all social sciences disciplines, the continuing importance of interdisciplinary approaches to research will result in the purchasing of material which does not fall strictly into the management collection’s parameters.

B. Scope of Coverage

1. Chronological Focus

The collecting of works characterized by a practitioner or applied orientation will be limited to items focusing on the post World War II period, with increasing focus given to more current works. The collection of theoretical works in management will not be governed by any chronological limitation.

2. Geographic Focus

Management practices in the major industrialized countries will be the focus of collection activities. The collection of theoretical works in management will not be governed by any geographic limitation.

3. Formats and Materials Collected

The collecting emphasis is on current monographs and journals. Monographs with CD-ROM’s may be added. Reference works (including online sources), technical reports, government document, and professional association publication are also collected. Bibliographies and conference proceedings are added on a selective basis.

Textbooks are not routinely added to the collection except for the highly selective acquisition of current titles which provide a broad overview of subject areas.

Microforms, audio, and video recordings will be acquired selectively or as requested by faculty.

Any change in the format in which journal literature is collected, e.g. from paper to electronic access, will be governed by the Libraries’ policy.

4. Formats and Materials Not Collected

The only limitation on formats and materials collected is that the devices and software necessary for their use be available in the Libraries.

5. Publication/Imprint Dates

Emphasis is placed on the acquisition of works currently available, with retrospective materials purchased very selectively.

6. Place of Publication

No limitation on items to be added to the collection will be made strictly based on place of publication.

7. Languages Collected

Material is collected only in the English Language. Translations into English are considered based on the other parameters put forth in this policy.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

See Appendix A for details.

D. Subjects Excluded

Subjects specifically excluded from the management collection are indicated by a “0" code in the collecting lever. See Appendix A for details.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Research in management may be facilitated through the use of statistical data files available from the Inter -University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR). These files and related documentation may be downloaded directly from ICPSR using the Libraries’ home page.

The Libraries maintains a collection of paper annual reports for companies listed in the Fortune 500. While the information is duplicated in many online databases and may be available through companies web cites, these reports are useful to the first time user of business information.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

The collection development policies in Accounting, Economics, Finance, and Marketing may be of interest to users of this policy.

G. Related Collection Evaluations 

 

APPENDIX A - SPECIFIC SUBJECTS COLLECTED (with collecting levels)

Please see bottom of page for list.

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL)  -- existing strength of collection  (required) Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal  (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate  (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. COLLECTING LEVEL CODES*

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A                 Comprehensive Level

B                Research Level (doctoral)

C1              Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2              Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D                Basic Information Level

E                Minimal Level

NC              Not Collected

 

The following is a detailed definition of each code:

A           Comprehensive Level.   

A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field.  This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.

B           Research Level.

A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources--  in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.

C1        Advanced  Study  Level.  

A  collection  which  is  adequate  to  support  the  course  work  of  advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works  of  more  important  writers,  selections  from  the  works  of  secondary  writers,  a  selection  of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject.

C2        Basic Study Level.   

A collection  which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs (as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.

D          Basic Information Level.  

A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.

E          Minimal Level.

A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.

NC       Not Collected.  

A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.

 

* The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

MUSIC

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The School of Music, including the areas of music education, musicology/composition, keyboard, strings, voice and winds/percussion, offers courses and curricula designed to train and educate students planning careers in music.  Additionally, the program is structured to allow students from other academic disciplines to enroll in music courses, to encourage and promote an understanding of music.  The undergraduate degrees of Bachelor of Music (BM), with a concentration of theory-composition or performance (piano, organ, voice, strings, wind or percussion); Bachelor of Music Education (BME) with an emphasis in instrumental music, vocal music, or special music education; and a Bachelor of Arts in Music (BA) are offered.   The University also offers a Masters of Music degree (MM), with concentrations in history-literature, piano pedagogy, theory- composition, conducting and performance; and a Masters of Music Education degree (MME) with concentrations in elementary music, choral music (with conducting option), instrumental music (with conducting or recital options), special education and voice.

An undergraduate degree, the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Performing Arts/Theatre with a track in Musical Theatre is awarded through the Theatre department, but is analyzed here as the majority of library materials supporting the program are of a musical nature (score, sound and video recordings) and a majority of the faculty teach in the school of music for the majority of their time.  A portion of the library materials budget, assigned to both theatre and music subjects, contributes to support this program.

According to Fall 2005 records there were 112 undergraduate music majors with a concentration in performance, 5 undergraduate music majors with a concentration in theory-composition, 108 undergraduate music education majors, 15 undergraduate music majors seeking a BA degree, 20 undergraduate music majors with an undecided concentration and 43 undergraduate musical theatre majors, for a total of 260 undergraduate students majoring in music.  With the inclusion of music theatre majors this total rises to 303 students.  Graduate students numbered 59, in addition to 16 non- degree seeking students.

The School of Music is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

2. Collection Description

The music collection is divided between the Ablah Library and the branch Music Library. The Music Library contains mainly scores and sound recordings, with small reference and reserve collections of books.  The Music Library is primarily a teaching library with materials used in daily instructional activities.  The Ablah Library mainly houses books and journals.

The collection holdings were compared against bibliographies contained in The Best Books for Academic Libraries, Music & Fine Arts, Volume 9, and A Basic Music Library: Essential Scores and Sound Recordings.  The results show that Wichita State University’s holdings currently contain 80% of the book titles listed in The Best Books for Academic Libraries. The current holdings are lacking only slightly overall with the most notable deficiencies being in titles focusing on popular music (70%), national music (52%), and individual biographies (81%).  But the lower percentages in these areas is tied to the curriculum emphasis and is to be expected.

The collection at Wichita State contains only 75% of the scores listed in A Basic Music Library, but a recent collection development project, ongoing since 2001, has been the acquisition of missing titles listed here.  Listed scores not yet acquired in this project are those areas with the largest number of titles missing from the Wichita State University collections. Annual purchases of commercially available titles from this list will continue to be made as funding allows.

The current sound recording collection holds all commercially available titles listed in A Basic Music Library for small and medium sized collections of Classical, Jazz and Musical Theatre works. The library will continue to acquire items designated for a large library in the areas of classical music, Jazz and musical theatre on an annual basis as funds allow. Though a secondary priority, the library has also begun collecting those recordings listed in the areas of rhythm and blues, soul and rap, blues, music of Colonial North America and the U.S. to about 1900, Gospel, and country music recordings as funds allow.

In the past 5 years the library has also collected video recordings in VHS, Laser Disc and DVD formats. The primary focus has been the acquisition of opera and musical theatre performances.  However the recent supplementation of solo and symphonic performance video recordings has been a welcome addition to the holdings and will continue to be expanded as more video recordings become commercially available and as funding allows.

In addition to monograph, score, and recordings collections, the library maintains 66 print subscriptions to music journals, 89% of which are indexed by Music Index and 74% of which are indexed by RILM. The library also currently subscribes to 52 electronic journals, 13 titles of which are not held locally in print.  Journal subscriptions should be maintained in the future as much as is possible, particularly as inflationary rates of music journals have risen very little.  If additional funding should become available in future, subscriptions to different instrumental society publications should be expanded, as they are notably underrepresented in the collection.

Additionally the library subscribes to 3 electronic databases specific to music: Grove Music Online, Music Index and RILM.  Those pursuing research at Wichita State also have many general databases available which cover journals in the arts.

A Basic Music Library: Essential Scores and Sound Recordings.  Chicago:  Music Library Association, 1997.

The Best Books for Academic Libraries.  Temecula, CA:  Best Books, Inc., 2002-.

3. Anticipated Trends

The importance of different and changing formats continues to strain the materials budget for music. Although separate funds have been designated for books, journals, serial publications, scores and sound recordings, changes in electronic formats will continue to be a challenge.

The LP collection continues to be useful, although to a shrinking population of the campus.  Duplicate, damaged and unsuitable LPs will continue weeded from the collection and replaced when feasible.

Video recordings, principally DVD format, in the collection are in great demand.  The opera and musical theatre portions of the collection continue to grow, but will need to be augmented in the areas of solo and symphonic performances, documentaries and instruction, as the market continues to expand.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

All time periods are collected.

2.  Geographic Focus

The music of Western Europe and North America is emphasized, but important materials regarding other geographic areas are acquired without limitations. Scores and recordings are collected without geographical consideration.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Acquisition is based on content.  The collection is comprised of monographs, serials, scores, sound recordings and video recordings.  All score formats, collected editions, monuments, study scores, and performing editions, and CD- ROMs, are collected, excepting parts for large ensembles (more than 9 parts). Sound recordings include LP and compact disc formats, although only compact discs are currently added to the collection.  Video recordings consist of laser disc, VHS and DVD formats although DVD format is given preference in acquisition of new titles, as they are supported in the classroom, more durable, and housed in an economic fashion.  Only videos playable in Region 1, the US, US Territories and Canada will be collected.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Large performing part sets (scores) comprised of more than 9 parts. No LPs or audio cassettes will be added to the collection, although the current holdings will be maintained where appropriate.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Current publications are emphasized but older publications will be acquired to fill in collection gaps.

6.  Place of Publication

Place of publication is not a limiting factor, but only videos playable in Region 1, (the US, US Territories and Canada) will be collected.

7.  Languages Collected

Regarding monographs and serials, English is preferred.  Important works in other languages are collected as needed. Where scores or recordings are concerned language is not a limitation in selection, particularly as music is accessible internationally.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

The Music Education Department has its own curriculum lab, with school music textbooks and recordings.  The School of Music maintains a choral library, band library, and orchestral library, each consisting of multiple parts for large ensembles. The library does not duplicate these resources.

The central branch of the Wichita Public Library provides an additional local source for patrons seeking music related materials.  The Wichita Public Library maintains a collection of monographs, sound recordings and video recordings emphasizing the performing arts, particularly in areas intertwined with popular culture.  Their catalog is available online.  In addition, the Wichita State University Interlibrary Loan department provides access to extensive resources through cooperative efforts on a national level.

E. Related Collection Development Policies

With respect for studies in Musical Theatre, please consult the Collection Development

Policy in Theatre (2004) for policies relating to additional support materials in this area.

F. Related Collection Evaluations

Please refer to: Collections Evaluation 2005 – Music containing a description of the 2005

Faculty Survey and an analysis of Interlibrary Loan Statistics.  This document may be found in the Collection Development and Subject Librarian offices.

G. Other Factors

APPENDIX A – SPECIFIC SUBJECTS COLLECTED (WITH COLLECTING LEVELS)

LC Class Divisions, Categories and Subjects CL GL
M 1-5 Collected Sets, Editions, Monuments C1 C1
M 6-2199 Instrumental and Vocal Music C1 C1
ML Literature on Music C1 C1
MT 1-165 Music Theory, Composition C1 C1
MT 170-960 Instrumental & Vocal Technique C2 C1
Not Applicable Sound Recordings C1 C1

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

APPENDIX C – COLLECTION COMPARISON TO THE BEST BOOKS FOR ACADEMIC LIBRARIES

Please see below.

 

Appendix D - Collection Comparison to a Basic Library

Please see below.

 

 

Old World History CD Policy

A.  Purpose of Collection

1.   Program Information

Although the History Department has taught European, Middle Eastern and Asian history at one point or another in its existence, its current Old World History focus is Europe. In this field, the department offers a Master of Arts degree.

The main areas of research in this area are the Ancient World, Late Antiquity, the High Middle Ages and modern Europe. The faculty include Ariel Loftus (Ancient Greece/Rome), Philip D. Thomas (Medieval Europe), Anthony Gythiel (Medieval Europe), George Dehner (History of Disease), Helen Hundley (Russia) and John Dreifort (modern Europe).

The students taking History courses are from a variety of disciplines across the WSU campus.

2.   Collection Description

The Old World History collection consists of paper books, electronic books, archival works, paper journals and electronic journal collections.

Due to our collaboration with the professors noted above, the Libraries’ book holdings in this regard are quality selections. When compared against the bibliographies in the Oxford Histories, the subject collections fared well for a master’s level program across the board.1   Historically, the collection has a strong base, encountering some holes in recent years due to budgetary and priority shifts. Recent retrospective collaborations have made a difference in bridging these gaps.

Although we still collect continuing series, those items have been targeted in the most recent budgetary shortfalls. It should be noted that many of these sets provide valuable primary source coverage. Consequently, they should be retained if at all possible.

It should be noted that there are several different collections related to this subject housed by the University Archives as well.

While suffering some cuts over the years, our journal holdings in this regard are strong. The faculty and librarians have worked together to maintain core journal collections. The recently acquired JSTOR Arts and Sciences Collections in addition to History Cooperative supplement these efforts in addition to adding journals in secondary fields (see Middle East and Asia).2   However recent budget cuts have taken their toll on those items. These journals need to be protected whenever possible in future serials reviews.

3.   Anticipated Trends

As with other areas within the Humanities and Social Sciences, two items will drive our collecting efforts for Old World History: access and budgets.

The balance between print and electronic media may help to bridge several gaps in the future. Certainly, in terms of electronic journals, we have benefited from publishers providing affordable journal packages here in the United States such as the History Cooperative, JSTOR and Project Muse. The success of the ACLS History E-Book Project indicates that subject-specific collections could potentially impact historical research to a greater degree than the general collections (e.g.: Netlibrary).

With Old World History, due to the collaboration between the faculty mentioned above and the liaison librarians, we have strong core collections for the most part, emphasizing quality over quantity.3  Given the budgetary situation and priorities both for the History department and the Libraries as a whole, this activity will need to be monitored carefully to insure a balance between a general collecting base, meeting faculty research needs and satisfying patron’s needs. To their credit, these professors make it a point to balance all three of these components in their requests for books and our discussions. Also, since Old World History literature does touch on other subject areas across campus, we do need to keep some works (mainly in translation but with some original holdings) available for patron use as well. These issues are concerns for the Old World History CD area.

B.  Scope of Coverage

1.   Chronological Focus

For Old World History, the primary chronological areas are Ancient World, Late Antiquity, Medieval and Modern.

Other areas can be collected depending upon available budgetary resources; the importance of the analyzed work(s) within the scope of Old World History in general and the quality of the scholarship in that work. For Europe, that activity would fall into the C1 or C2 levels. For the Middle East and Asia, despite the fact that these are secondary areas for the History Department but are taught in Women Studies by Drs. Deborah Gordon and Doris Chang, these areas should not fall beneath a D Level but should be kept at C2 if at all possible. These designations will be explained in Appendix B.

2.   Geographic Focus

The History Department’s primary geographic foci are Western Europe, the Mediterranean World and Russia. As noted earlier, interdisciplinary activities within Women Studies (Middle East and Asia) should be considered wherever possible.

3.   Formats and Materials Collected

For Old World History literature, the collecting efforts include printed works both in English and other languages where appropriate. The following formats are collected: books, journals and serials. As noted above, when the appropriate opportunity arises to investigate electronic access for Old World History journals and electronic works, we will do so.

4.   Formats and Materials Not Collected

Although the focus will primarily be on those formats and materials noted in Section 3 above, other formats will be considered according to the relevance to the overall major and the History Department, courses of study, areas of faculty research/teaching, and overall continuity of the collection. As I said in Section 3, such endeavors will be subject to availability, overall collecting priorities and budgetary constraints.

5. Publication/Imprint Dates

Most purchases will be recently published works although out of print works will also be considered. Retrospective projects conducted between faculty members and the subject librarians will be considered as well depending upon available budget, collection priorities, the time involved and the project scope.

6.   Place of Publication

All academic publishers’ works are considered. However, some publishers’ works will tend to be purchased more than others. In all cases, the work’s overall quality not just the publisher or its reputation will determine a purchase.

7.   Languages Collected

Works in this field are collected primarily in English. All secondary works (unless requested by the faculty members) are collected in English. Primary sources can be collected in other languages. However again, foreign language sources will be collected in translation whenever possible. If a faculty member requests that a source be acquired in the original language, every effort will be made to get the work as permitted by availability and available funds.

C.  Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

The main areas collected here at WSU include:

Subject

 

General Europe

LC Class

 

D

Current Collection Strength

 

C1

United Kingdom

DA

C1

Central Europe

DB

C2

France

DC

C2

Germany

DD

C2

Greco-Roman World

DE

B

Greece

DF

C1

Italy

DG

C2

Low Countries

DH

C2

Netherlands

DJ

C2

Russia, former Soviet Union

DK

C1

Northern Europe;

 

 

Scandinavia

DL

C2

Spain and Portugal

DP

C2

Switzerland

DQ

C2

Balkan Peninsula/Turkey

DR

D

Asia

DS

C1

Africa

DT

Not major area

Oceania

DU

Not major area

Gypsies

DX

Not major area

D.  Subjects Excluded

There are no excluded subjects. Although some may only be collected at a minimal (re: level as spelled out in Appendix B.

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Any collaborative interdisciplinary collecting effort should interact with those from the other History Department subject areas for budgetary reasons. Other subjects affected are: MCLL, Gender Studies, Religion, English Literature, Political Science in addition to other Social Science and Humanities areas. Interdisciplinary certificate programs such as the new Medieval and Renaissance Studies certificate will impact these collaborative efforts in a positive way.

F.   Related Collection Development Policies

Any Old World History CD Policy should interact with those from the other History Department subject areas for budgetary reasons. Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, Gender Studies, Philosophy, Religion and other Humanities areas.

G.  Related Collection Evaluations

See E and F above.

H.  Other Factors

Access to Old World History sources (largely in English language interdisciplinary sources) is available through Project Muse, History Cooperative and JSTOR. Core electronic book collections can be found through the ACLS History E-Book Project and the Oxford Histories noted above.

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Philosophy CD Policy

A.  Purpose of Collection

1.   Program Information

Philosophy is an undergraduate department consisting of eight full-time faculty members. As such, the courses taught there are on the undergraduate level although there are some undergraduate/graduate and graduate level classes offered in the catalog. 

The faculty performs research in several areas including the History of Philosophy, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Social Science, Metaethics, Philosophy of Religion, Philosophy of Language, 19th century Philosophy, Epistemology, Logic, Early Modern Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy, Ethics, and gender-related issues.

The majority of students from this department go onto prestigious graduate programs.

2.   Collection Description

The Philosophy collection consists of paper books, journals, and electronic materials.

Due to the collaboration noted above, the Libraries’ collection in the stacks is strong. When checked against the Bibliography in The Oxford History of Western Philosophy, the collection came out well as most of the books on the list are in the stacks. (see attached)

Journal access is another story. Although retrospective holdings are good, recent budget cuts have taken their toll on the recent issues. How the advent of databases such as Project Muse, Kluwer, and JSTOR remains to be seen. (see attached for more details) 

Format and access can vary as well. Through our electronic packages, the Libraries can get to electronic books through NetLibrary (although this is not a particularly strong area for either the Regent’s Collection or our local collection).

3.   Anticipated Trends

As with the other areas within the Humanities, two issues drive this matter: access and budgets.

The balance between print and digital access will determine which journals are collected, how quickly the most recent issues are available, and what our archives will look like in the coming years. The rising cost of journal subscriptions will also force decisions in spending for book budgets. Finally, with the acquisition of electronic databases such as the Philosopher’s Index, Wilson Web’s Humanities Index, JSTOR, and Project Muse, the question needs to be raised: which of these databases are the most essential? What is the preferred method of listing content: full-text or bibliographic (abstract/citations)? Each one has its advantages and disadvantages.

With Philosophy, due to the effective collaboration between the department and the Libraries, the collection is a solid one. This collaboration should continue working together in an equitable fashion. Given the budgetary situation looming in front of the Libraries and WSU in general, this activity will help to pinpoint important books in this discipline as well as helping to keep librarians up to date with the priorities of this department. However, despite this efficiency, one question remains: given the seniority of many members of the Philosophy faculty, will the Libraries have the funds to help new faculty (if/when they are hired) with book purchases in their areas of focus? This area is a concern for the Philosophy CD area.

B.  Scope of Coverage

1.   Chronological Focus

For Philosophy, the primary chronological areas are Ancient Greece and Rome, the Early Modern, Modern, and Postmodern periods.

Studies of medieval philosophy can be collected depending upon available budgetary resources, the importance of the analyzed work(s) within the History of Philosophy in general and the quality of the scholarship in that work. In any event, that collecting will never exceed D Level as explained in Appendix B.

2.   Geographic Focus

The primary geographic foci are U. S., Britain, and Asia. Greece and Rome are collected for Antiquity.

3.   Formats and Materials Collected

For Philosophy, the collecting efforts include primary and secondary sources. The following formats are collected: books, some dissertations, journals and serials in addition to e-texts (books, electronically accessible works).

4.   Formats and Materials Not Collected

Although the focus will primarily be on those formats and materials noted in Section 3 above, other formats will be considered according to relevance to the overall program, courses of study, areas of faculty research/teaching, and overall continuity of the collection. Such acquisitions will be made with respect to available funds and opportunities.

5.   Publication/Imprint Dates

Most purchases will be recently published works although out of print works will also be considered. Retrospective projects conducted between faculty members and the subject librarian will be considered as well depending upon available budget, collection priorities, time involved, and the project scope.

6.   Place of Publication

All academic publishers’ works are considered. However, some publishers’ works will tend to be purchased more often than others. In all cases, the quality of the work not just the publisher or its reputation will determine a purchase.

7.   Languages Collected

Most works collected in this field are in English. All secondary materials (unless specifically requested by a faculty member) are in English. Primary sources can be collected in other languages. However again, foreign language sources will be collected primarily in translation where possible. If a faculty member requests that a source be acquired in the original language, every effort will be made to get the work as permitted by availability and available monies.

C.  Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

These areas are the main collecting areas for Philosophy. For information on existing collection ratings, please refer to the conspectus sheets in Appendix A .

 

Subject                        Current Collection Level                    LC Class

 

Philosophy (general)

C2

B

Ancient Philosophy

C1

B

Logic

C2

BC

Speculative Philosophy

D

BD

Aesthetics

D

BH

Ethics

C2

BJ

D.  Subjects Excluded

There are no excluded subjects. Although some may only be collected at a minimal (re: level as spelled out in the Appendix B.

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Any Philosophy collecting effort should interact with those for History, Religion, MCLL, Political Science, Economics, Gender Studies, Astronomy, and English as a subject within the Humanities and/or Social Sciences. In addition, due to Philosophy of Science applications, the Physical Sciences are also tangentially related to this discipline as well.

F.  Related Collection Development Policies

Any Philosophy CD policy should interact with those for History, Religion, MCLL, Political Science, Economics, Gender Studies, Astronomy, and English as a subject within the Humanities and/or Social Sciences. In addition, due to Philosophy of Science applications, the Physical Sciences are also tangentially related to this discipline as well.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

See E and F above.

H. Other Factors

Access to Philosophy sources is available through JSTOR, the Philosopher’s Index, Project Muse and Wilson Web’s Humanities Index.

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Physician Assistant Collection

A. Purpose of Collection

1.  Program Information

The WSU Department of Physician Assistant offers a 26-month graduate course of study which leads to a professional Master Degree in Physician Assistant Studies. The course of study is divided into two parts: a 41 semester hour didactic phase and a 39 semester hour clinical/research phase.

The pre-professional curriculum includes requirements for a bachelor degree as well as prescribed courses in the natural and clinical sciences. Once applicants have met the minimal requirements, emphasis in selection is placed on academic performance, previous health care experience (strongly preferred), on-site interview, and a service orientation. Up to 42 students will be selected annually.

The professional curriculum is divided into two phases: a didactic phase and a clinical/research phase. Each phase lasts 12-14 months. The didactic year includes graduate coursework in the basic sciences (anatomy, pharmacology, pathophysiology), clinical sciences, research methods and statistics, epidemiology, behavioral medicine, ethics, preventive medicine and community health, social and legal issues, and clinical skills.

The clinical/research year is a series of clinical rotations in a variety of medical settings primarily in Kansas and directed studies in research leading to the completion of a final research project. Students are required to complete rotations in family practice, general internal medicine, pediatrics, prenatal care and gynecology, general surgery, emergency medicine, psychiatry and behavioral medicine, and geriatrics. Students complete nine rotations of 4-8 weeks each (approximately 50 total weeks). All students are required to complete a minimum of three rotations outside the city of Wichita with at least three rotations in a rural or urban underserved community.

2.  Collection Description

The physician assistant profession stands on its own. It maintains its own professional associations, its own code of ethics, and its own standards. Its resource base, however, is borrowed from the other health care professions. The 2003 version of the “Brandon/Hill Selected List of Print Books and Journals in Allied Health” [1] listed only eight resources under the heading “Physician Assistant.” These publications are core resources for PAs, and, although more and more books are being published each year, essential areas of study are not included. At the present time, medical texts are the best resources for physician assistant collections.

The library’s monograph collection currently contains over 7000 titles in the main library of Congress call number relevant to General Medicine (R), Preventive Medicine (RA), Pathology (RB), Internal Medicine (RC), Surgery (RD), Ophthalmology (RE), Gynecology and Obstetrics (RG), Pediatrics (RJ), Dermatology (RL), and Pharmacology (RM). The collection also includes over 2500 additional titles in related areas as Biochemistry (QD415-436), Human Anatomy (QM), Physiology (QP), and Nursing (RT).

The library has subscriptions to three academic journals that specific on Physician Assistant professional and education. The library has all of them both in print and electronically. Actually, the journals that PA faculty and students have been really using a lot are those major medicine periodicals. The library has subscriptions to 165 medicine periodicals. 24 of them are available both in print and electronically. Also, there are 1615 electronic journals available under the subject section of Medicine.

Patrons have both on-campus and off-campus access to a number of high quality electronic databases on medicine. MEDLINE, CINAHL with Full Text, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Nursing are the primary databases for this discipline. Faculty had addressed that MEDLINE, CINAHL with Full Text, and Cochrane Library are the most important ones for their research and teaching needs.

3.  Anticipated Trends

Faculty in the Physician Assistant department have noted several emerging trends in their field: 1) Increasing focus on the medical specialties 2) Increasing interest in more genetics education for primary care provider.

In terms of desirable formats of materials, most faculty have expressed strong interests on more electronic access to several major medical journals such as The Journal of American Medical Association, LANCET, British Medical Journal, etc.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Emphasis is placed on current materials. Historical treatments will be acquired selectively.

2.  Geographic Focus

Areas of emphasis will be primarily of those publications treating health care in the United States although materials reflecting geographical emphasis outside of the United States might be acquired selectively.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on current journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, rule books, etc.), and government publications, where applicable. Both paper and electronic formats will be collected. Materials such as videos and DVD’s will be collected at the request of faculty.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will be collected only when that is the sole format available. Textbooks are not normally acquired.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Primary emphasis will be on current publication; older materials in support of research or teaching will be acquired selectively.

6.  Place of Publication

Primary focus will be placed on materials published in the United States. Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.  Languages Collected

English is the primary language of acquisition, Materials in other languages may be acquired at the request of the faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

The training for physician assistants is 108 weeks, compared to the 158-week medical program [2], and has often been compared to the middle two years of medical school [3, 4]. Although much of the same core material is covered, the PA curriculum does not include the in-depth research level knowledge that may be required at a full medical school. Physician assistants must know a little about many different aspects of medicine. They must have the skills to make qualified diagnoses and to provide appropriate treatment, and they must have the knowledge to counsel and educate patients. Most importantly, they must have the expertise to make informed referrals of patients to other health care providers. To this end, physician assistant education stresses problem solving and critical thinking skills for effective clinical decision making. As such, physician assistants need practical, clinically oriented resources that provide a broad overview of a field of study.

Materials were collected in three related science areas and most medical subject areas -- Medical Biochemistry, Human Anatomy, Physiology, General Medicine, Preventive medicine, Occupational medicine/toxicology, Pathology, Internal medicine, Surgery, Ophthalmology, Gynecology and obstetrics, Pediatrics, Dermatology, Pharmacology, and pain medicine. Among those areas, faculty identified Human Anatomy, Preventive Medicine, Internal Medicine, Gynecology and Obstetrics, Pediatrics and Pharmacology as areas of major importance.

In General Medicine, core subject areas addressed by faculty included: physician assistant profession, primary care/family practice, and medical education. In Internal medicine, faculty identified diagnosis, critical care, emergency medicine, infectious diseases, neurology, psychiatry, cardiology, pulmonary medicine, gastroenterology, urology, and geriatrics as the key subject areas.

D. Subjects Excluded

Since physician assistants must know a little about many different aspects of medicine, the PA collection covers most major subject areas under Medicine (R) except Dentistry and Nursing. In the Science group (Q), Biochemistry, Human anatomy, and physiology are the only three subject areas that Physician Assistant collection currently covers.

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Although the physician assistant program at Wichita State is the only one of its kind in Kansas, It doesn’t necessarily mean that we can’t take advantage of the library resources available for the medical students in KU.  As we’ve discussed before, for the physician assistant profession, its resource base is borrowed from the other health care professions. At the present time, medical texts are the best resources for physician assistant collections. Farha Medical Library of KU school of medicine in Wichita and Dykes Library of KU Medical Center generously supplement the WSU Library’s medicine collection.

The nursing collection here in WSU is also important to the research and teaching needs of the Physician Assistant program.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Collection Development Policies related to all of the subject areas listed above would have an impact on the library’s collection for Physician Assistant program.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Physician Assistant Collection Analysis – Please see Appendix C

Summary of the Survey of Physician Assistant Faculty – Please see Appendix D

H. Other Factors

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

 

References

1    Hill DR, Stickell HN. Brandon/Hill selected list of print books and journals in allied health. J Med Libr Assoc. 2003.  Jan; 91 (1):18–33.

 

2    Falligant L. Physician assistants (PAs) provide quality care. Wis Med J. 1997.  Jun. 96:(6):13.

 

3    Minton DL. What is a physician assistant? N C Med J. 1990.  Aug. 51:(8):391–2.

 

4    Benathen IA. The physician assistant program: training for a medical career without medical school. Am Biol Teach. 1989.  Mar. 51:(3):162–4.

 

Physics

A. Purpose of Collection

•     Program Information – The Physics department offers courses of study leading to the BA and BS.  Physics graduates will have an understanding of basic physical phenomena and the theoretical framework required to interpret these phenomena.

1.  Collection Description 

Given that the Physics department’s focus is primarily on undergraduate study the collecting will be done primarily at the C2 level. This does not ignore the fact that the faculty in Physics and many other departments use upper level material in this field.

2.  Anticipated Trends

The physics research community is moving towards open access. Preprint servers and conference proceedings will continue to be critical to scholarly communication in physics.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological

Focus is on current materials, a small collection of classical and historical materials will be bought

2.  Geographic Focus

Primary emphasis is placed on the United States with selective emphasis on the U.K.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Primary emphasis will be on monographs and serials.  Other formats will be purchased at the request of faculty.

4.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Current dates only.  There will be no retrospective collecting unless specifically requested by faculty or to replace missing core materials.

5.  Place of Publication 

Primarily U.S.

6.  Languages Collected

non-english materials will be bought at the specific request of faculty only.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D. Subjects Excluded 

NA

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Mathematical physics will be purchased under Mathematics.  Collaborate with Education librarian to purchase physics education titles.

F.  Related Collection Development Policies

Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Engineering

H. Other Factors

I buy a lot of lower level books, including text books for the very active undergraduate physics program.  These basic materials are important because most nonmajors lack extensive background in the field and require materials that supplement their course texts.

 

Appendix A – Specific Subjects collected (with Collecting Levels)

SUBJECT LC CLASS CL GL
General Physics QC 1-75 C2 C2
Mechanics QC 120-159 C2 C2
Atomic Physics QC 170-220 C1 C2
Heat QC 251-318 C2 C2
Heat Transfer QC 319.8-338 C2 C2
Optics QC 350-467 C1 C1
Electricity QC 501-718.8 C2 C1
Magnetism QC 770-798 C1 C1
General Astronomy QB 1-139 C1 C2
Practical Astronomy QB 145-237 C1 C2
Theoretical Astronomy QB 351-480 C1 C2
Descriptive Astronomy QB 500-595 C1 C2
Planets, Comets, Meteors QB 600-791 C1 C2
Stars QB 801-903 C1 C2

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

 

Public Administration/Urban Affairs

A.  Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

This policy provides a basis for selection and acquisition of materials that support the graduate curriculum and research needs of the Hugo Wall School of Urban and Public Affairs. The Hugo Wall School is divided into three components: the Master’s of Public Administration Program (MPA), the Center for Urban Studies, and the Kansas Public Finance Center. The collection was deemed adequate for the MPA program by the NASPAA (National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration,) who in 2002 granted accreditation to the MPA program for the next seven years. The collection partially meets the needs of the faculty research and the two centers within the Hugo Wall School.

The Hugo Wall School supports a Master’s in Public Administration (MPA) program that requires core competency in the following: public management, public finance, and public policy and their application to state and local governments. Areas of concentration for the degree include public management, public finance, and public policy and their application to state and local governments. There is a capstone class that all MPA students must complete.

The Hugo Wall offerings also a graduate certificate in Public Finance consisting of 12 hours of coursework and the

There are also three upper-division undergraduate elective courses offered by the school. Two are cross-listed and one is an Issues and Perspectives class.

Course subjects in the MPA program include: research methods, planning, comparative public administration, administrative theory and behavior, non-profit management, computer applications, state and local law, environmental law, economics, human resources, and budgeting and finances.

There are several cross-listed courses that are offered by the Hugo Wall School. The cross-listed departments are Criminal Justice, Ethnic Studies, Gerontology, Political Science, Economics, and History. Also, there are courses that are offered by other departments that will stand as meeting the pre-requisites for MPA classes.

The Center for Urban Studies and the Kansas Public Finance Center are staffed by Hugo Wall School Faculty and a professional research staff as well as graduate assistants. The purpose of the Center for Urban Studies is to conduct research, offer training and professional development, and provide technical assistance and consultation to elected officials, state and local public managers, community organizations and professional associations in Kansas. The purpose of the Kansas Public Finance Center is to develop and implement public strategies that promote economic vitality in Kansas; and advance the study and practice of public finance. Both of these services to the community require the substantial research materials to achieve their respective goals.

2. Collection Description

The Public Administration/Urban Affairs Collection is a wide-ranging collection that encompasses materials from many different topical areas including public administration, local government, planning, economics, land use, transportation, commerce, finance, community studies, criminology, social welfare, law, civil engineering, and public utilities.

3. Anticipated Trends

Given the reduction in materials funds in both 2000 and 2003 that reduced both the print serial and the monograph budget of the library as a whole, it is unlikely unless new outside resources are found that the budget for Public Administration will increase. Currently, new serial titles will only be considered if another title or combination of titles costing an equivalent amount are forfeited. Future cuts may further diminish the effectiveness of the collection.

Serials inflation is currently at 10% per year. This is also a contributing factor to the budgeting complications.

As a consolation, when made possible through electronic journal packages purchased by the University Libraries, some print cancellations may be available as an electronic journal. Links to these packages and titles will be made available on the University Libraries “E-Journal” webpage, and will be linked to in the WSU Libraries Online Catalog.

Due to the ever growing number of commuter and distance students at Wichita State University, there is a trend to meet the research needs of students by providing materials in an electronic (online) fashion. The most prominent of these materials being online journals, although electronic books are also available. The WSU Libraries use of a proxy server (E-Z Proxy) facilitates usage of these materials both on and off campus.

The future procurement of local (Wichita, KS) documents and materials will be handled between the bibliographer and the WSU Government Documents Librarian. Purchases will be made as documents become available and their presence is made known to the selectors.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.    Chronological Emphasis by Content:

Materials covering all time periods will be considered although primary emphasis will be placed on materials from the late 20th (1990-) and 21st Century.

2.   Geographic Emphasis:

Emphasis will be placed in the following order (greatest to least emphasis): Wichita, Kansas; Kansas; Surrounding States (Missouri, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Colorado); Rest of United States; Rest of World. The main geographic focus is the United States, although sources related non-U.S. locations are becoming more common as globalization has become a factor in local affairs, especially in the larger locales.

3.   Formats and Materials Collected

The primary formats to be considered for purchase will be books (monographs) and journals.

Books will primarily be collected in a paper format. A small percentage of electronic books will be considered on a case by case basis to insure appropriateness to the collection. As electronic books are an emerging technology, not all titles will be available in this format.  Electronic books will be made available to the off campus community via the WSU Libraries proxy server whenever possible.

Journals will be collected in both paper and electronic format, although a preference will be given to the electronic format when it is available and is cost effective. Electronic journals will be made available to the off campus community via the WSU Libraries proxy server whenever possible.

The most current format of audio/visual materials adopted by the library will be collected only under the strictest scrutiny due to the potentially high cost of these materials.

Electronic formats other than e-books and e-journals (CD-ROMS, programs on disk, etc.) will only be collected when they are included with a purchase of an approved format.

4. Formats and Materials Not Collected

Back issues of journals, outdated monograph editions, obsolete audio/visual formats, new audio/video formats not yet adopted by the library, electronic formats other than e-books and e-journals.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

‚ÄčEmphasis will be placed on the most recent publications and current imprint dates.

6.   Places of Publication

As Kansas and the United States are the primary geographic focuses of the collection, the publications will primarily emanate from within the United States. Although given the global nature of the subject area, all places of publication will be considered for the collection of the seminal works in the Public Administration/Urban Affairs field and to meet the teaching and research needs of the department.

7.   Language:

English is the primary language of the collection. Foreign language materials will be considered when requested by a WSU faculty member.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for collection levels and codes explanation, Appendix B for specific details regarding the collection.)

The collection levels displayed in Appendix B are indicative of the materials items added under the provisions of this collection development policy. Subject areas that contain materials primarily covered in another discipline’s collection development policy may appear to be collected at a lower level than expected. (i.e., Criminology is collected at a very basic level under the cover of Public Administration, but the Criminal Justice collection will cover criminology at a much more complete collection level.)

D. Related Collection Evaluations

AVAILABLE IN COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT OFFICE, ABLAH LIBRARY

E. Subjects Excluded

General legislative and executive papers

Political science (General) Political theory

Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration

International law

International relations

Special types of environment

Including soil pollution, air pollution, noise pollution

Industrial and factory sanitation

Industrial and factory wastes

Rural and farm sanitary engineering

Social sciences (General) Statistics (General)

Economic theory. Demography

Finance (General)

    Socialism. Communism. Anarchism

Sociology (General)

Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform

The family. Marriage. Women

Societies: secret, benevolent, etc.

Low temperature sanitary engineering

Hazardous substances and their disposal

F. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

There are several subject disciplines that closely related to and overlap with the Public Administration/Urban Affairs collection. These subjects include: Political Science, Criminal Justice, Social Work, Gerontology, History, Economics, Ethnic Studies, Sociology, Law, and Women’s Studies. Each of these areas has their own unique collection development policy.

The Government Document Depository also provides key documents in support of the discipline. Government Documents also has a unique collection development policy.

G. Related Collection Development Policies

Political Science Criminal Justice Social Work Gerontology History Economics Ethnic Studies Sociology Law Women’s Studies

H. Other Factors

Requests for materials will be considered in its relation and appropriateness to this collection development policy as well as the cost of the item.

Requests will be considered in the following priority:

1.   Faculty Requests

2.   Student Requests

3.   Other user requests

Acceptance of gift materials will be based on their appropriateness to the collection.

APPENDIX A-Specific Subjects Collected (including collected levels)

Please see bottom of page

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Social Work

A. Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The School of Social Work offers degrees at both the Bachelor and Master levels.  The Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) program was accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in 1974, and reaccredited in 1996.  The Master of Social Work (MSW) program received candidacy status for accreditation through the CSWE in 1999, and submitted its Self Study report to that agency in December of 2001.  The School continues to work towards achieving full accreditation for this program in the near future.

Both the Bachelor and Master degree programs require a combination of coursework and field (practicum) work.  In these programs, students acquire basic social work skills and gain an understanding of a broad range of human interactions, from the individual to societal levels.  The goal of the programs is to prepare students for generalist and advanced generalist Social Work practice.

Generalists provide services to individuals, families, small groups, organizations, communities and society as a whole in a wide variety of settings, and with a diverse clientele.

The majority of students graduating from WSU’s Social Work programs remain in the Wichita area to work.  At the completion of these programs, students must sit for the Association of Social Work Boards examinations to obtain licensure to practice in the state of Kansas.  Three exams are offered, including the Baccalaureate Social Worker (BSW), Master Social Worker (MSW) and the Specialist Clinical Social Worker (LSCSW).

The Social Work collection serves the needs of the Social Work faculty, which includes nine permanent faculty, five adjuncts and 2 graduate assistants.  The coIlection also serves nearly 300 students in the undergraduate and graduate programs.

2. Collection Description

The Library’s monograph collection currently contains over 7,500 titles in the core Social Work Library of Congress call number areas of HV 1 - HV 5840.  This number does not reflect the thousands of titles held in related disciplines such as psychology, criminal justice, gerontology, minority studies, sociology, education, and women’s studies that are also heavily used by students and faculty in Social Work.

The library also maintains subscriptions to twenty-nine journals related specifically to Social Work. Twenty titles owned by the Library are considered to be core Social Work journals (as indicated in the Social Work Abstracts).  Ten to fifteen Social Work journals are also available electronically and in full- text.  The Social Work journal collection is supplemented by substantial holdings in the related subject areas mentioned above.  While Social Work faculty have indicated that the journal collection is basically adequate for their needs, subscriptions to additional titles have been requested.  Of primary interest is the journal Research on Social Work Practice.  Other titles requested include Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services, Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work, Journal of Teaching in Social Work, and Journal of Technology in Human Services.

Finally, researchers have both on-campus and off-campus access to the primary index to the journal literature in Social Work—the Social Work Abstracts.  Remote access to indexes in related subject areas is also available. Examples of these indexes include PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, ERIC and the Social Sciences Abstracts.

3. Anticipated Trends

As the School of Social Work achieves accreditation for its Masters level program, an emphasis will need to be placed upon acquiring research materials in both print and electronic formats to support the program.  It is anticipated that increased access to electronic full-text journals and electronic books will also be desirable.

Faculty in the School of Social Work have identified the following as areas of emerging interest:  school Social Work, technology based Social Work, spirituality in Social Work, empowerment practice, chaos and complexity theory, evidence based practice, equity for women and other women’s issues, groups, privatization of Social Work services, and clinical Social Work/Mental health.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.       Chronological Focus

Emphasis is placed on works dealing with contemporary Social Work issues and practice.  However, materials that provide the historical background for the field of Social Work are also of value, and will be collected selectively.

2.       Geographic Focus

Works related to the practice of Social Work in the United States will be the primary focus of the collection.  Special emphasis will be placed on materials related to the State of Kansas.  Of special interest are materials covering services for the many ethnic groups represented in the state and the Wichita area, including Hispanics, African-Americans,  Vietnamese and other Asian groups, and Native Americans.  Materials on Social Work as practiced in other countries may also be of value, and will be collected selectively.

3.       Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on current journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, etc.), government publications, and professional association publications.  Proceedings and conference papers are collected selectively.  Electronic resources will be increasingly important. Video formats are beginning to be requested with some regularity, and will be purchased when requested by faculty if the budget allows.

4.       Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will be collected only when that is the sole format available. Textbooks are not normally acquired, but may be purchased from time to time to provide broad overviews of some subject areas.

5.       Publication/Imprint Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials; older materials will be added selectively.

6.       Place of Publication

Primary focus will be placed on materials published in the United States.  Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.       Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected.  Materials in other languages will be collected at the request of faculty.

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

A broad range of Social Work materials is collected.  Special emphasis is placed on the method and theory, as well as the study and teaching, of Social Work.  Other areas of interest include: social welfare policy and laws; Social Work practice and education; social services administration; Social Work with families, children, adolescents, the elderly, and other special groups of people; poverty; homelessness; substance abuse; child abuse and domestic violence; foster care; mental health; community organizations, involuntary clients; social justice; and Social Work ethics.

(See  Appendix A for Details)

D. Subjects Excluded

None

E. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Other major segments of the Library’s collection that would be of importance to Social Work research include, but are not limited to, Psychology, Sociology, Women’s Studies, Gerontology, Education, Urban Affairs, Minority Studies, Criminal Justice, Public Health, and U.S. and state law.

F. Related Collection Development Policies

Collection Development policies related to all of the subject areas mentioned above would have an impact on the library’s research collection for Social Work.

G. Related Collection Evaluations

Evaluation of the Social Work Monograph Collection -- Please see Appendix C Evaluation of the Social Work Journal Collection – Please see Appendix D Summary of the Survey of Social Work Faculty – Please see Appendix E

H. Other Factors

None

APPENDIX A- Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Divisions, Categories & Subjects CL GL
HV 1-10 General Works C1 C1
HV 10.5 Social Work as a profession C1 C1
HV 11-38 Study and teaching, Research, Schools, Social Work Education C1 C1
HV 40-69 Social Service, Social Work, Charity Organization and practice C1 C1
HV 70-547 State regulation of charities, Public welfare laws C1 C1
HV 551.2-696 Emergency management, Relief in case of disasters (includes refugees) C2 C2
HV 697-3174 Protection, assistance and relief--Special Classes(families, women, children, adolescents, aged, people with disabilities) C1 C1
HV 3176-4013 Protection, assistance and relief--Special classes (by race or ethnic group) C2 C1
HV 4023-4630.9 Protection, assistance and relief--Poor in cities, Slums (poverty, homelessness) C1 C1
HV 4701-4959 Protection, assistance and relief--Protection of animals D D
HV 4997-5840 Substance Abuse (includes treatment) C1 C1

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Spanish

A. Purpose of Collection

1.  Program Information

Spanish is one of the languages taught within the Modern Languages and Literatures department here at WSU.  The majority of the department’s faculty is tied into this discipline, teaching several undergraduate and graduate classes. This subject area generates major grants bachelor’s and master’s degrees.  The undergraduate courses include Elementary Spanish, Intermediate Spanish, Selected Spanish Readings, Spanish Conversation, Intermediate Spanish Readings and Cooperative Education: Spanish.  The graduate offerings include Spanish Phonetics, Major Topics in Spanish, Spanish Conversation III, Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition, Survey of Spanish Literature, Contemporary Spanish Theater, Contemporary Spanish Novel, Business Spanish, Survey of Latin American Literature, Contemporary Latin American Novel, Spanish Civilization, Latin American Civilization, Contemporary Latin American Theater, Latin American Short Story, Introduction to Romance Linguistics, Mexico:  It’s People and Culture and South America:  It’s People and Culture.

The main areas of focus are medieval, early modern and modern Spanish literature (Iberia) in addition to the literatures of Central and South America.  These areas will be further developed by the addition of two new Iberianists.  Michael McGlynn does medieval studies.  Kerry Wilks studies El Siglo del Oro (“Golden Age” being the sixteenth -eighteenth centuries).

The students taking Spanish are undergraduates and graduates from a variety of disciplines across the WSU campus including history, the humanities, business, education, physical sciences, health sciences and social sciences.

2.  Collection Description

The Spanish collection consists of paper books, some journals, database access and e-book access.    Due to our collaboration with Drs. Pedro Bravo-Elizondo and Eunice Myers, the Libraries’ book holdings are strong, especially for those works published in the last thirty years.  When checked against A New History of Spanish Literature (1961 edition), that part of the collection is not that strong although we do have 30-35 percent of the holdings.  However, another analysis focusing on a comparison of our holdings with A Companion to Spanish-American Literature shows that our holdings have improved over time. This test revealed that the Libraries have 75% of that bibliography’s titles. Unlike most of its MCLL counterparts, these holdings are strong both in Spanish and English.  [i]

We tend not to collect dissertations, essay collections or conference proceedings for this area, as it is an undergraduate program.  However, these items are available upon request.

Our journal holdings in this regard are not as strong as they could be.  Interdisciplinary journals as well as those literary journals in English provide the bulk of our coverage.  We do have a few core Spanish language journals, which we are still receiving and several historical runs up in the general stacks.  However recent budget cuts have taken their toll on those items.  Running our historical and present-day collections up against the MLA Bibliography reveals that our original language collections are weak in this regard.  As such, researchers rely heavily on Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery for most of their materials.  These journals need to be protected whenever possible in future serials reviews.

Database access remains limited to mostly English language works.  The only access we have for Spanish language works comes through the MLA Bibliography.  That database, however, provides citations and abstracts only.  While there are links to full text, they are from other databases and then, only those that we subscribe to.  Full text access to articles in English comes from JSTOR (retrospective coverage) and Project Muse (mostly the last fifteen years’ of publication runs). Humanities Index and InfoTrac Web’s Expanded Academic, Business and Company and Health and Wellness Resource Centers provide some additional coverage for English works.  Yet in the latter’s case, only 1 out of every 4 academic works is available in full text. For education, one might refer to ERIC.  For the health sciences, one can look to CINAHL and MEDLINE.  For business, ABI-Inform and Lexis-Nexis Academic remain the two chief sources.  In general social sciences, one could look at Sociological Abstracts, WilsonWeb Social Sciences Abstracts, Social Work Abstracts and Social Work Abstracts. E-Book coverage remains in flux as well.  Netlibrary does not have a great deal of Spanish literature, historical or cultural works in its holdings.  With the possible addition of the ACLS Humanities E-Book and other packages may offer possibilities in this regard.  For allied fields, one might refer to the e-book holdings in those areas.

3.    Anticipated Trends

As with other areas within the Humanities, two items will drive our collecting efforts for Spanish: access and budgets. In addition, what occurs in the allied fields noted above will affect Spanish as well.

The balance between print and electronic media may help to bridge several gaps in the future. Certainly, in terms of electronic journals, we could stand to benefit if publishers provide affordable foreign language journal packages here in the United States.  In such a case, Spanish journals would rank as a first priority in this regard.  The same can be said for Spanish monographs and source materials.  Fortunately, the interdisciplinary coverage in JSTOR and Project Muse does assist in bridging this gap.  Once again, however, this balance can change depending upon budgets and which databases we can acquire/hang on to in the future.  While the Libraries probably will not increase its holdings in foreign language journals or databases in a large way, our access to materials in English could benefit from adding JSTOR’s Arts & Humanities II and III packages to our repertoire.  Cost could determine whether we keep Project Muse beyond 2005 so we need to plan accordingly.  A switch to EBSCOHost Expanded Academic could increase access as well.  In terms of e-book coverage, an increase in Netlibrary, ACLS History E-Book Collection and/or other collections in this regard can only help narrow this gap while providing quality materials to our patrons.

With Spanish, due to the collaboration between Drs. Bravo-Elizondo and Myers with the liaison librarians, we have strong collections in this field.  Given the budgetary situation and priorities both for the MCLL department and the Libraries as a whole, this activity will still need to be monitored carefully, balancing faculty research with student needs.  This observation is due to the hiring of new faculty members in this discipline.  Also, since Spanish literature does touch on other subject areas across campus, we need to keep collecting minimal works (in the original and in translation for patron use as well.  Finally, as other areas do touch on Spanish as a second language in a tangential sense to varying degrees, they need to be considered on a case by case basis.  These issues are concerns for the Spanish CD area.

B.      Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

For Spanish literature, the primary chronological areas are medieval, Renaissance, Early Modern and Modern Spanish Literature. Other areas can be collected depending upon available budgetary resources; the importance of the analyzed work(s) within the scope of Spanish literary history in general and the quality of the scholarship in that work. In any event, that activity would never exceed D Levels as explained in  Appendix B.

2.  Geographic Focus

The primary geographic foci are Spain, Central America, South America, Cuba and the Caribbean.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

For Spanish literature, the collecting efforts include printed works both in English and Spanish.  The following formats are collected:  books, journals and serials.  As noted above, when the appropriate opportunity arises to investigate electronic access for Spanish language journals and electronic works, we will do so.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Although the focus will primarily be on those formats and materials noted in Section 3 above, other formats will be considered according to the relevance to the overall major and department (MCLL), courses of study, areas of faculty research/teaching, and overall continuity of the collection.  As I said in Section 3, such endeavors will be subject to availability, overall collecting priorities and budgetary constraints.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Most purchases will be recently published works although out of print works will also be considered. Retrospective projects conducted between faculty members and the subject librarians will be considered as well depending upon available budget, collection priorities, the time involved and the project scope.

6.  Place of Publication

All academic publishers’ works are considered.  However, some publishers’ works will tend to be purchased more than others.  For Spanish, Puvil and Peter Lang are top publishers.  Distributors include Puvil , Schoenhoff’s and BNA. In all cases, the work’s overall quality not just the publisher or its reputation will determine a purchase.

7.  Languages Collected

Works in this field are collected in both English and Spanish.  All secondary works (unless requested by the faculty members) are collected in English.  Primary sources can be collected in other languages. However again, foreign language sources will be collected in translation whenever possible.  If a faculty member requests that a source be acquired in the original language, every effort will be made to get the work as permitted by availability and available funds.

C.      Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

These areas are collected here at the WSU Libraries:

Spanish Literature to 1700 PQ C1
Spanish Literature 1700-1868 PQ C1
Spanish Literature 1866-1960 PQ D
Spanish Literature 1961- PQ C1
Spanish Literature in the US PQ C2
Spanish Literature-Mexico PQ C2
Spanish Literature-Mexico to 1810 PQ C2
Spanish Literature-Mexico 19th/20th PQ C1
Sp. Lit-West Indies & C. America PQ C2
Sp. Lit-Cuba PQ C1
Sp. Lit-Puerto Rico PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Central America PQ C2
Sp. Literature South America (general) PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Argentina (all areas) PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Bolivia PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Chile (all areas) PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Columbia PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Ecuador PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Guyana PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Uruguay PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Peru (all areas) PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Venezuela PQ C2
Sp. Literature-Africa PQ D
Sp. Literature-Asia and Australia PQ D

D.      Subjects Excluded

There are no excluded subjects.  Although some may only be collected at a minimal (re: level as spelled out in  Appendix B.

E.      Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

Any Spanish literature collecting effort should interact with those from the other MCLL subject areas for budgetary reasons.  In addition, comparative literature affects Spanish and can be considered as well.  Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, education, business, social sciences, health sciences, philosophy, religion and other humanities areas.

F.       Related Collection Development Policies

Any Spanish literature CD Policy should interact with those from the other MCLL subject areas for budgetary reasons.   In addition, comparative literature affects Spanish and can be considered as well. Other subjects affected are: history, English literature, education, business, social sciences, health sciences, philosophy, religion and other humanities areas.

G.      Related Collection Evaluations

See E and F above.

H.     Other Factors

Access to Spanish literature sources (largely in English language interdisciplinary sources) is available through Project Muse and JSTOR.  Bibliographic citations can be found in the MLA Bibliography and Humanities Index (WilsonWeb).  In the allied fields, one should search in the respective main databases and search engines accordingly.

APPENDIX A-Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC Class Line Number Divisions, Categories and Subjects CL GL
  LLL 109 Spanish Literature-Before 1500 D D
PQ 6271-6498 LLL 110 Spanish Literature to 1700 C1 C1
PQ 6500-6576 LLL 111 Spanish Literature 1700-ca. 1868 C1 C1
PQ 6600-6647 LLL 112 Spanish Literature 1868-1960 D D
PQ 6651-6676 LLL 113 Spanish Literature, 1961 CQ CQ
PQ 6155-6168 LLL 114 Spanish Literature-Folklore & Folk Literature C2 C2
PQ 7000-7061 LLL 115 Spanish Literature-Provincial in Europe D D
  LLL 116 Spanish Literature-Popular Literature C2 C2
PQ 7071-7079 LLL 117 Spanish Literature in U.S. & Canada C2 C2
PQ 7080-7099 LLL 118 Spanish Literature in Spanish America (General) C2 C2
PQ 7100-7295 LLL 119 Spanish Literature of Mexico, former Provinces  C2 C2
PQ 7296 LLL 120 Spanish Literature-Mexico -to 1810/25 C2 C2
PQ 7297 LLL 121 Spanish Literature-Mexico-19th, 20th centuries C2 C2
PQ 7310-7349 LLL 121.5 Spanish Literature - former Provinces Now in U.S. C2 C2
PQ 7361 LLL 122 Spanish Literature of West Indies & C. America C2 C2
PQ 7370-7390 LLL123 Spanish Literature - Cuba C1 C2
PQ 7420-7440 LLL 124 Spanish Literature - Puerto Rico C2 C2
PQ 7471-7539 LLL 125 Spanish Literature-Central America C2 C2
PQ 7551-7557 LLL 126 Spanish Literature of South America, General C2 C2
PQ 7600-7795 LLL 127 Spanish Literature-Argentina, General C2 C2
PQ 7796 LLL 128 Spanish Literature-Argentina -to 1810/25 C2 C2
PQ 7797 LLL 129 Spanish Literature-19th, 20th Century C2 C2
PQ 7800-7820 LLL 130 Spanish Literature-Bolivia C2 C2
PQ 7900-8095 LLL 131 Spanish Literature-Chile, General C2 C2
PQ 8096 LLL 132 Spanish Literature-Chile to 1800 C2 C2
PQ 8097 LLL 133 Spanish Literature-Chile, 18th, 19th, Century C2 C2
PQ 8160-8180 LLL 134 Spanish Literature-Columbia C2 C2
PQ 8200-8220 LLL 135 Spanish Literature-Ecuador C2 C2
PQ 8230-8239 LLL 136 Spanish Literature-Guyana C2 C2
PQ 8250-8259 LLL 137 Spanish Literature-Paraguay C2 C2
PQ 8300-8495 LLL 138 Spanish Literature-Peru, General C2 C2
PQ 8496 LLL 139 Spanish Literature-Peru -to 1810/25 C2 C2
PQ 8497 LLL 140 Spanish Literature-Peru 19th, 20th Ceuntury C2 C2
PQ 8510-8519 LLL 141 Spanish Literature-Uruguay C2 C2
PQ 8530-8549 LLL 142 Spanish Literature-Venzuela C2 C2
PQ 8600-8919 LLL 143 Spanish Literature of Africa D D
PQ 8650-8829 LLL 144 Spanish Literature-Asia & Australia D D

APPENDIX B - EXPLANATION OF COLLECTING LEVELS AND CODES

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Sport Management

A.  Purpose of Collection

1. Program Information

The Department of Kinesiology & Sport Studies in the College of Education reorganized into two units in the Fall of 2007 – the Department of Sport Management (formerly Sport Administration) and the Department of Human Performance Studies (formerly Exercise Science).    The  Department  of  Sport  Management  offers  both Bachelors  and  Masters degree programs, and provides coursework in sport marketing, sport law, sport management, sport facility management, financial management, public relations, ethics in sport, and sociology of sport.  The Sport Management collection serves the needs of the department’s four permanent faculty members, numerous lecturers and guest faculty, and approximately 200 students in its undergraduate and graduate programs.  Undergraduate students make up the majority of students enrolled in the Sport Management program, but the department also features a large graduate program with more than 75 students.  The program is currently approved by the Sport Management Program Review Council, and will seek accreditation by the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation when that organization finalizes its accreditation principles and procedures within the next year.

2. Collection Description

The Library’s monograph collection currently contains over 800 titles in the Library of Congress call number range relevant to Sport Management --  Sports, Coaching, Sports Administration, Ball games, Track and field, etc. (GV 557- GV 1570).  The collection also includes around 30 additional monographs in related areas such as Sports Law (primarily K 3989).  Thousands of titles in other relevant parts of the collection, such as Business Management, Business Marketing, Finance, Sociology, Psychology, Ethics, etc., may also be used by students and faculty in Sport Management, and help to supplement the Sport Management Collection.

The Library maintains subscriptions to eleven journals closely aligned with Sport Management.  Nine of these are also available electronically and in full text.  A substantial number of additional paper and full text electronic subscriptions are maintained in related subject areas.  For example, over 130 electronic journals are available in the Business collection, and over 600 electronic journals in the Sociology and Psychology collections. Overall, the journal collection for Sport Management and Sport Law needs to be improved.

Faculty have cited a limited number of electronic subscriptions and a lack of international journals as weaknesses of the journal collection.

Researchers have both on-campus and off-campus access to a number of indexes to the journal literature. SportDiscus Full Text, SBRnet (Sport Business Research Network), and Lexis/Nexis Academic (law and newspapers) are the primary indexes for this discipline. Other useful indexes maintained by the Library include ABI/Inform (business), Business and Company Resource Center (business), Wilson Business Full Text (business), Expanded Academic ASAP (general database with good coverage of the areas within Sport Management), PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Campus Research (law), and LegalTrac (law).

3. Anticipated Trends

Faculty in the Department of Sport Management have noted Ethics in Sport, Sport Law, Sport Public Relations and Sport Sociology as areas of increased and ongoing research in their field.

In terms of desirable formats for materials, Faculty have indicated that the trend is towards electronic journals and current journals as the most important kinds of publications for their research, followed closely by Internet resources and indexes to periodicals.  For their teaching needs, they have identified Internet resources as most important, followed by current  journals  and  textbooks,  and  then  electronic  journals  and  books  other  than textbooks. These priorities should be kept in mind as new materials are acquired.

B.  Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Emphasis is placed on works dealing with contemporary issues and practice.  However, materials that provide historical information are also of value, and will be collected selectively.

2.  Geographic Focus

Works focusing primarily on the United States will be collected.  Materials related to Sport Management in other countries, and global issues in sport are also important, and will be collected selectively.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Collecting emphasis is placed on current journals, monographs, reference works (including indexes to periodicals, encyclopedias, handbooks, rule books, etc.), and government publications, where applicable.  Both paper and electronic formats will be collected, with a priority placed on the electronic format.   Materials such as videos and DVD’s will be collected at the request of faculty.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Materials in micro format (microfilm, microfiche) will be collected only when that is the sole format available. Textbooks are not normally acquired, but may be purchased from time to time to provide broad overviews of some subject areas.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

An emphasis will be placed on recently published materials; older materials will be added selectively.

6.  Place of Publication

Primary focus will be placed on materials published in the United States.   Materials published in other countries will be collected selectively.

7.  Languages Collected

English-language materials will be collected.  Materials in other languages will be collected at the request of faculty.

C.  Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

Key subject areas noted by faculty include: sport sociology, sport psychology, the international foundations of sport, sport management, sport leadership, sport operations management,  event   and   venue   management,   sport   governance,  ethics   in   sport management, sport marketing, sport public relations, sport finance, accounting, economics of sport, legal aspects of sport, and strategic management/policy development.

D.  Subjects Excluded

Materials on popular sports topics and sports figures will typically not be collected for the Sport Management collection.  These should be purchased selectively with funds designated for undergraduate materials and the general collection.

E.  Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

The library collection at the University of Kansas that supports its Bachelor, Master and PhD programs in Sport Science may supplement the WSU Library’s collection.

Other areas of the WSU Library collection that are of importance to research in Sport Management include, but are not limited to Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Management, Finance, Economics, Business Ethics, Public Relations, Women’s Studies, Sociology, Psychology, and General Law.

F.  Related Collection Development Policies

Collection Development Policies related to the subject areas listed above would have an impact on the Library’s research collection for Sport Management.

G.  Related Collection Evaluations

H.  Other Factors

None

Appendix A – Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

Sport Management

LC Class Divisions, Categories & Subjects CL GL
GV 200.66 Recreation leadership, Recreation centers, Outdoor life, etc. E E
GV 201-555 Physical education and training (Collected under the Human Performance Studies CD Policy) NC NC
GV 557-1570 Sports, Coaching, Sports Administration, Ball games, Track and field, etc. C2 C1

GV 706.5

Sport Sociology

C2 C1

GV 713-716

Sport Management, Sport Economics

C2 C1

GV 750-1198

Specific sports--e.g., water sports, winter sports, baseball, basketball, soccer, football, golf, tennis, volleyball, cycling, track, boxing, martial arts, etc.

D D
GV 1199-1570 Games, card games, board games, etc. E E
GV 1580-1799.4 Dancing (Collected under the Dance CD Policy) NC NC
GV 1800-1860 Circuses, spectacles, etc. E E
K 59, K 3702, KB 76, KD 76, KF 3985-3989 Sport Law E C1

Appendix B – Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

 

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Theatre

A. Purpose of Collection

1.  Program Information

A part of the School of Performing Arts, the theatre program offers a Bachelor’s degree of Fine Arts in Performing Arts/Theatre with four tracks: theatre performance; design and technical theatre; musical theatre and secondary education – speech theatre 6-12; and a Bachelor’s degree in Art in Theatre. A minor in theatre is also offered. The theatre program places emphasis on the applied aspects of acting, directing, design (stage, lighting, costume) production and makeup. All majors are required to participate in some capacity in University theatre productions.

In the Fall 2011 semester there were 109 Theatre majors, with the Theatre Performance (54) and Musical Theatre (55) tracks having the highest number of declared majors.

2. Collection Description

The theatre collection overlaps with that of literature. This policy deals only with the performing aspects of theatre. The literary aspects, plays, technique of composition and criticism are considered a branch of English literature and are not discussed here.

The Musical Theatre program also overlaps with activities in the School of Music. As the Musical Theatre faculty are also faculty in the School of Music and as the majority of musical theatre materials are classified and housed in the music collections of the University Libraries, Musical Theatre collection development is discussed in the Music collection development policy.

The collection holdings were compared against the bibliography contained in The Language of Theatre, 1998; and in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre & Performance, 2003. The results show that Wichita State University’s holdings currently contain nearly 58% of the listed titles in both bibliographies. It is in the geographic subject subdivisions relating to theater outside of Europe and North America where the WSU collection is lacking. This is to be expected as these areas have generally been beyond the scope of the curriculum at Wichita State University. Where titles pertaining to general theatre studies, and theatre in Europe or North American were found absent from the holdings, titles were marked for future acquisition and a number of works are currently on order. See Appendix C.

Journals made up 30 of the titles listed in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre & Performance. The WSU Libraries maintain subscriptions, either online or in print, to 18 of these 30 titles. Only 5 of the 18 current subscriptions are available in print format. Access to current online issues of theatre journals, the remaining 13 titles, is due to the access provided by large journal package subscriptions, such as JSTOR or Project Muse.

Though the library does not provide access to an online database devoted solely to theatre, other cross-disciplinary databases contribute to studies in theatre, most often Proquest Research Library, Academic Search Complete, and JSTOR.

Harrison, Martin. The Language of Theatre. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Kennedy, Dennis. The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre & Performance, vol.2. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

3. Anticipated Trends

Video recordings have become increasingly useful as instructional tools, and will continue to do so. VHS Recordings of theatrical performances and cassette tapes of dialect instruction will be replaced in favor of digital formats as commercial availability and funding allows. Books in digital format are often highly desirable, and are expected to be purchased as more titles in this subject area become available.

B. Scope of Coverage

1.  Chronological Focus

Mid-16th century (Shakespeare) through the present.

2.  Geographic Focus

North America and Western Europe are emphasized.

3.  Formats and Materials Collected

Monographs and Videos are emphasized.  Serials remain important.  Other non-book formats are purchased on faculty request or to upgrade formats.

4.  Formats and Materials Not Collected

Cassette and VHS tapes.

5.  Publication/Imprint Dates

Current publications are emphasized but older publications will be acquired to fill in collection gaps. Antiquarian collecting is not pursued.

6.  Place of Publication

Place of publication is not a limiting factor.

7.  Languages Collected

English is preferred.  Other languages are collected as may be appropriate for historical treatises.

 

C. Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

(See Appendix A for Details)

D. Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts

The central branch of the Wichita Public Library provides an additional local source for patrons seeking materials on theatre. The Wichita Public Library maintains a collection of monographs and videos emphasizing the performing arts, particularly popular biographies. Their catalog is available online. In addition, the Wichita State University Interlibrary Loan department provides access to extensive resources through cooperative efforts on a national level.

E. Related Collection Development Policies

Please refer to: Collection Evaluation 2012 – Theatre containing a description of the 2012 Faculty Survey. This document may be found in the Collection Development and Subject Librarian offices.

Interlibrary loan statistics were not available for evaluation at this time. It is intended that the next policy revision should include this data.

F. Other Factors

 

Appendix A – Specific Subjects Collected (with Collecting Levels)

LC CLASS Divisions, Categories and Subjects CL GL
PN 1576-1590 Performing Arts in General and Special Topics C2 C2
PN 2021-2049 Collections, Reference Works, General Works C2 C2
PN 2053 Management, administration, Production, Direction C2 C2
PN 2058-2080 Art of Acting C1 C1
PN 2085-2099 Stage and Accessories C1 C1
PN 2131-2193 History by Time Period C2 C2
PN 2219.3-2569 Theater in U.S., Canada, and Latin America C1 C1
PN 2570-2859 Theater in Europe C2 C2
PN 2860-2960 Theater in Asia E D
PN 2969-2993 Theater in Africa E D
PN 3011 Theater in Australia and New Zealand E E
PN 3035 Jewish Theater E E
PN 3151-3171 Amateur Theatricals E E
PN 3175-3191 College and School Theatricals D E
PN 3203-3299 Tableaux, Pageants, "Happenings" etc. E E

Appendix B – Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

1. Collecting Levels

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional) 

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. Collecting Level Codes

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A       Comprehensive Level

B       Research Level (doctoral)

C1     Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2     Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D       Basic Information Level

E       Minimal Level

NC     Not Collected

The following is a detailed definition of each code: 

  •  A - Comprehensive Level
    • A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a “special collection”; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.
  • B - Research Level
    • A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research.
  • C1 - Advanced Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject. 
  • C2 - Basic Study Level
    • A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.
  • D - Basic Information Level
    • A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.
  • E - Minimal Level
    • A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.
  • NC - Not Collected
    • A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.
    • The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Appendix C – Collection comparison to The Language of Theatre and The Oxford Encyclopedia of Theatre & Performance

THE LANGUAGE OF THEATRE: 34 titles listed   19 titles at WSU

  In OEOT&P at WSU
Reference Works and Theatre Histories 21 14
Theoretical and General Works 38 25
Ancient Europe 18 13
Medieval Europe 13 12
Europe 1500-1700 34 25
Europe 1700-1900 39 28
Europe Since 1900 41 27
Russia and Soviet Union 19 11
Africa 29 6
South Asia 24 2
South-East Asia 14 3
East Asia 38 15
North America 38 34
Latin America and Caribbean 19 13
Principle Journals 30 18*

* 5 current print subscriptions and 13 current online subscriptions

Total number of titles listed: 459

Total number of titles owned: 265 (57.73%)

Subject Librarian:  Rachel Crane, Music/Fine Arts Librarian

 

Revised October 2012

WOMEN'S STUDIES COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT POLICY
 

Subject Librarian: Angela Paul, Research Services Librarian
Email: angela.paul@wichita.edu
Phone: 978-5084
Policy created: December 2003; revised December 2016
 

A.    Purpose of Collection

1.     Program Information: The Center for Women’s Studies/Religion offers a bachelor of arts with a focus in either Humanities or Social Science. A 15-hour minor is offered as well.  An emphasis in Women’s Studies is offered in the following graduate programs:

  • Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (MALS)

  • Curriculum and Instruction Counseling

  • Educational and School Psychology

  • Sociology

  • Cross-Cultural Communication

2.      Collection Description: Given that the Women’s Studies department’s focus is primarily on undergraduate study the collecting is done primarily at the C2 level.  The above mentioned graduate subjects that offer an “emphasis” in Women’s Studies is supported at the C1 level. The collection is broad and interdisciplinary in nature to emphasize the needs of the WSU community, in addition to the students and faculty of the Women’s Studies department.  This does not ignore the fact that the faculty in Women’s Studies and many other departments use upper level material in this field.

3.      Anticipated Trends: Use of videos as an instructional methodology has become increasing popular and important in this area.  Discretionary funds are not adequate to accommodate this trend.  Gift funds are used primarily to support this need at this time.  Due to the amount of publishing in Women’s Studies students and faculty will have to rely on the library’s interlibrary loan service.  Other document delivery services will continue to be investigated.
 

B     Scope of Coverage

1.    Chronological Focus: On current materials; a small collection of classical and historical materials will be bought

2.    Geographic Focus: Primary emphasis is placed on the United States with selective emphasis on Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East.

3.    Formats and Materials Collected: An effort is made to acquire materials from alternative presses to insure a diverse collection. Audio-Visual materials are purchased with faculty input.

4.    Formats and Materials Not Collected: Textbooks are not acquired.

5.    Publication/Imprint Dates: Current dates only.  There will be no retrospective collecting unless specifically requested by faculty or to replace missing core materials.

6.     Place of Publication: Primarily U.S.

7.     Languages Collected: Non-English materials will be bought at the specific request of faculty only.
 

C.    Summary of Subjects Collected and Collecting Levels

                (See Appendix A for Details)
 

D.        Subjects Excluded:

  • Women in specific fields, i.e. women in literature, women in religion, women in science, etc.

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    Marriage and interpersonal relationships

E.       Related Collections and Cooperative Efforts: the interdisciplinary nature of women’s studies requires cooperation among the bibliographers, particularly the social sciences and humanities.

F.      Related Collection Development Policies: Social Science Reference; policies are found online at http://libraries.wichita.edu/c.php?g=464279 and in print in the Collection Development and Subject Librarian offices.

G.      Other Factors: N/A


Appendix A—Specific Subjects Collected with Levels 

 

SUBJECT

CL

GL

African American women

C1

C1

Feminist Theory

C1

C1

Feminists

C2

C2

Feminist ethics

C2

C2

Gender issues

C1

C1

Global perspectives on women

C1

C1

Legislation and women’s rights

C2

C2

Lesbian Studies

C2

C2

Sex role

C2

C2

Women and feminism

C2

C2

Women in popular culture

C2

C2

Women’s organizations

D

D

 

Appendix B – Explanation of Collecting Levels and Codes

1. COLLECTING LEVELS*

Current Collection (CL) -- existing strength of collection (required)

Collection Goal (GL) -- desired or target collecting goal (required)

Acquisitions Commitment (AC) -- current collecting level or growth rate (optional)

Preservation Commitment (PA) – commitment to physical and/or content preservation (optional)

2. COLLECTING LEVEL CODES*

Each collecting level is assigned one of the following codes:

A             Comprehensive Level

B             Research Level (doctoral)

C1           Advanced Study Level (advanced undergraduate, masters)

C2           Basic Study Level (undergraduate)

D             Basic Information Level

E              Minimal Level

NC          Not Collected

 

 

The following is a detailed definition of each code:

A     Comprehensive Level. A collection in which a library endeavors, so far as is reasonably possible, to include all significant works of recorded knowledge (publications, manuscripts, other forms) for a necessarily defined field. This level of collecting intensity is that which maintains a "special collection"; the aim, if not the achievement, is exhaustiveness.

B     Research Level. A collection includes the major published source materials required for dissertations and independent research including materials containing research reporting, new findings, scientific experimental results, and other information useful to researchers. It also includes all important reference works and a wide selection of specialized monographs, an extensive collection of journals and major indexing and abstracting services -- including electronic resources-- in the field. Supports doctoral and other original research. 

C1   Advanced Study Level. A collection which is adequate to support the course work of advanced undergraduate and master’s degree, or sustained independent study; that is, which is adequate to maintain knowledge of a subject required for limited or generalized purposes, of less than research intensity. It includes a wide range of basic monographs both current and retrospective, complete collections of the works of more important writers, selections from the works of secondary writers, a selection of representative journals, and the print and electronic reference tools and fundamental bibliographical apparatus pertaining to the subject.

C2   Basic Study Level. A collection which is adequate to support undergraduate courses. It includes a judicious selection from currently published basic monographs (as represented by Choice selections) supported by seminal retrospective monographs ( as represented by Books for College Libraries); a broad selection of works of more important writers; a selection of the major review journals; and current editions of the most significant print and electronic reference tools and bibliographies pertaining to the subject. Not adequate to support master’s degree programs.

D     Basic Information Level. A highly selective collection which serves to introduce and define the subject and indicates the variety of information available elsewhere. It includes major dictionaries and encyclopedias, selected editions of important works and bibliographies, historical surveys, a few major periodicals in the field, and a limited collection of basic electronic resources.

E      Minimal Level. A subject area in which few selections are made beyond very basic works.

NC  Not Collected. A subject area in which no selections are made, i.e. out of scope.

*The collecting levels and codes assigned to each LC Class are derived from the WLN Conspectus.

Written by Angela Paul

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Summary of Departmental Collection Needs

The following is a summary of important demographic and collection information for each academic department at Wichita State University. This information helps guide the WSU Libraries subject librarians in developing collections that support the learning, teaching, and research needs of the departments.

A full description of collection needs and interests are found in the subject policy for each department. A major project is underway to revise all of the Libraries' subject policies. Click here for online versions of recently revised policies.

 

If you have questions about a particular summary, please contact the appropriate Subject Librarian or the Coordinator of Collection Development. 

 

Key for Demographics Column:

BA (Bachelors)

MA (Masters)

PhD (Doctorate) 

U (# Undergraduates) 

G (# Graduates)

CH (# Credit Hours) 

F (# Faculty)

5 yr circ (% of library items added in last five years that have circulated)

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